Is Big Tech Good For Your Health? • Discoverology

Is Big Tech Good For Your Health?

Health, Tech, Videos

Health care is in the midst of a digital revolution and it is generating an ocean of data. Tech giants including Google and Microsoft want to work with hospitals and health-care systems to improve lives. But should people trust them with their medical data?

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