Should We Abolish Private Schools? • Discoverology

Should We Abolish Private Schools?

Politics, Videos

A disproportionate number of people who occupy the top jobs across the UK – from the prime minister and leading politicians to judges and entertainers – were privately educated. Campaigners who think this situation has gone on too long are asking why we have private schools and whether it is time to get rid of them.

Related tags
Related posts
Inside China’s Ghost Cities

Inside China’s Ghost Cities

Architecture, Cities, Videos

Australia’s 60 Minutes TV program visited China’s eerie ghost towns. An entire city – all the buildings, the roads, schools, hospitals, you name it – except the people. There is not a soul to be seen.

Dubai’s Plan to Outlive Oil

Dubai’s Plan to Outlive Oil

Cities, Videos

Dubai does have oil, but today it only accounts for less than one percent of its GDP. What looks like a pure extravagance is actually pure marketing genius, attracting 14 million international visitors a year, who spend more than any other city in the world, 65% more, even, than New York or London.

Heatworks’ Tetra, An Internet-Connected Compact Countertop Dishwasher

Heatworks’ Tetra, An Internet-Connected Compact Countertop Dishwasher

Innovation, Tech, Videos

Tetra is an internet-connected compact countertop dishwasher invented by Heatworks. It requires no plumbing and can be placed and used anywhere with a standard electrical outlet. With a smaller capacity than the average dishwasher available on the market today, Tetra holds two full place settings or 10 plates or 12 pint glasses.

The ‘Lost Rambos’ Of Papua New Guinea: How Weapons And Hollywood Changed Tribal Disputes

The ‘Lost Rambos’ Of Papua New Guinea: How Weapons And Hollywood Changed Tribal Disputes

Crime, Videos, World

Tribal fighting has long been present in the Papua New Guinea highlands, but the influx of modern automatic weaponry in the 1990s turned local disputes into lethal exchanges. Bootleg copies of the American film Rambo circulated in remote communities, becoming a crude tutorial on the use of such weaponry.

How Offshore Oil Rigs Work

How Offshore Oil Rigs Work

Business, Explainers, Videos

Offshore oil rigs are inherently a higher-cost, higher-risk method of oil extraction, but the oceans are, of course, home to a huge proportion of the world’s oil reserves so, if there are no more low-cost oilfields on land, that’s where the companies go.

How Earth Would Look If All The Ice Melted

How Earth Would Look If All The Ice Melted

Nature, Videos, World

As National Geographic showed us, sea levels would rise by 216 feet if all the land ice on the planet were to melt. This would dramatically reshape the continents and drown many of the world’s major cities.

How One NASA Image Tells Dozens Of Stories

How One NASA Image Tells Dozens Of Stories

Nature, Science, Videos, World

In 2016, NASA used the Suomi NPP weather satellite to create a high resolution image of the earth at night. It can help us better understand the current developments and conflicts underway. The amount of light pollution is most severe in heavily populated areas, as well as in regions of high prosperity.

How To Stop Plastic Getting Into The Ocean

How To Stop Plastic Getting Into The Ocean

Nature, Videos

By 2050 there could be more plastic in the ocean by weight, than fish. Plastic pollution is definitely one of the largest threats our oceans face today. Meet the engineers who are using rubbish-guzzling boats to stem the flow at its source.

How Much McDonald’s Franchise Owners Really Make Per Year

How Much McDonald’s Franchise Owners Really Make Per Year

Business, Food, Videos

The food at McDonald’s has always sold like hotcakes but once the restaurant started franchising, the world began eating up the brand. But being a franchise owner isn’t as easy, or profitable, as you might think. Buying into a McDonald’s franchise is expensive, between $1 million and $2.2 million.

Living Off The Grid In Paradise

Living Off The Grid In Paradise

Videos, World

Warrick Mitchell lives deep in one of the world’s most remote locations: Fiordland, New Zealand. His home in the country’s oldest national park is nestled in a vast wildness accessible only by boat or airplane, a four day’s walk from the nearest road.

How America Ends

How America Ends

Politics

The United States is undergoing a transition perhaps no rich and stable democracy has ever experienced: Its historically dominant group is on its way to becoming a political minority—and its minority groups are asserting their co-equal rights and interests.

Why Perfect Grades Don’t Matter

Why Perfect Grades Don’t Matter

Life, Videos

Research shows that chasing after perfect grades discourages creativity and reduces academic risk-taking. The constant quest for perfect grades can lead to high stress and mental health problems. Here’s why good grades don’t always translate into success in life.

How Facebook Works For Trump

How Facebook Works For Trump

Long Reads, Media, Politics

During the 2016 election cycle, Trump’s team ran 5.9 million ads on Facebook, spending $44 million from June to November alone. He won the presidency by using the social network’s advertising machinery in exactly the way the company wanted. He’s poised to do it again.

The Quickest Way To Fix Presidential Elections

The Quickest Way To Fix Presidential Elections

Politics

Abolishing the Electoral College and creating a national popular vote are far-fetched ideas for now. But there’s a more targeted way to reform American elections by 2020—starting with the swing states.

The Death And Afterlife Of The Mall

The Death And Afterlife Of The Mall

Architecture, Cities, Videos

Once a cornerstone of American consumerism, shopping malls are now mostly ghost towns. In a new episode of The Atlantic’s Idea File, staff writers Jim and Deb Fallows explore the phenomenon of the dead mall, and its emerging afterlife.

Is The Hidden Kingdom Of Saudi Arabia Ready To Open To The World?

Is The Hidden Kingdom Of Saudi Arabia Ready To Open To The World?

Videos, World

The ‘hidden kingdom’ of Saudi Arabia has been mostly closed to journalists and travelers…until now. In a glitzy PR push, the country wants to promote itself as a tourist destination. Foreign Correspondent rides the magic carpet to extraordinary sites, thousands of years old, holding mysteries archaeologists are just beginning to uncover.

We use cookies on this website to analyse your use of our products and services, provide content from third parties and assist with our marketing efforts. Learn more about our use of cookies and available controls: cookie policy. Please be aware that your experience may be disrupted until you accept cookies.