Best Science Articles & Videos on the internet • Discoverology

Science

Read the best science articles from around the internet, or watch the most insightful science videos from platforms like Youtube, Vimeo or leading science publishers like The Smithsonian, Quanta Magazine, New Scientist, Pacific Standard and many more.

The Rise Of Junk Science

The Rise Of Junk Science

Long Reads, Media, Science

Fake publications are corrupting the world of research—and influencing real news. At the most benign level of the junk industry are papers, published in journals with no effective screening process, that are obvious nonsense.

Can You Die From A Broken Heart?

Can You Die From A Broken Heart?

Health, Science

The emotional devastation of losing a loved one can certainly feel like physical pain. But can you really die from a broken heart? As it turns out, you can, from “broken-heart syndrome,” also known as stress-induced cardiomyopathy.

The Race To Develop The Moon

The Race To Develop The Moon

Long Reads, Science

For science, profit, and pride, China, the U.S., and private companies are hunting for resources on the lunar surface. It’s not difficult to imagine moon development, like all development, proceeding less than peacefully, and less than equitably.

What Happens To Your Body After You Die?

What Happens To Your Body After You Die?

Explainers, Science, Videos

Whatever your beliefs, most people seem to agree that the body left behind when we depart this mortal coil is just a heap of bones and flesh. Assuming that nature is left to its own devices, our bodies undergo a fairly standard process of decomposition that can take anywhere from two weeks to two years.

How A Volcanic Eruption Helped Create Modern Scotland

How A Volcanic Eruption Helped Create Modern Scotland

History, Nature, Science

Over seven terrible years in the 1690s, crops failed, farming villages emptied, and severe famine killed up to 15% of the entire population of Scotland. Soon after, the formerly independent nation joined Great Britain. Now, researchers suggest volcanic eruptions thousands of kilometers away may have helped spark this political transformation.

Is Our Brain Hard-Wired To Be Optimistic?

Is Our Brain Hard-Wired To Be Optimistic?

Psychology, Science

Psychologists have found that 80% of people have, what they define as an optimism bias and that’s regardless of whether they believe themselves to be more pessimistic or realistic. The optimism bias is our tendency to underestimate the likelihood of negative events and overestimating the likelihood of positive events.

Could Air-Conditioning Fix Climate Change?

Could Air-Conditioning Fix Climate Change?

Innovation, Nature, Science

Air conditioning systems can replace the entire air volume in an office building five or 10 times an hour.  Machines that capture carbon dioxide from the atmosphere—a developing fix for climate change—also depend on moving large volumes of air.  So why not save energy by tacking the carbon capture machine onto the air conditioner?

Bashir Sultani

Inspiration
Bashir Sultani
The Real Reason The Sound Of Your Own Voice Makes You Cringe

The Real Reason The Sound Of Your Own Voice Makes You Cringe

Psychology, Science

A common explanation is that because we normally hear our own voice while talking, we receive both sound transferred to our ears externally by air conduction and sound transferred internally through our bones. This bone conduction of sound delivers rich low frequencies that are not included in air-conducted vocal sound.

Can One Earthquake Trigger Another On The Other Side Of The World?

Can One Earthquake Trigger Another On The Other Side Of The World?

Nature, Science, World

It’s well known that natural disasters can cause others in their immediate vicinity, for instance, hurricanes are often accompanied by flooding, and earthquakes are followed by aftershocks. But what about longer distance interactions? Could one earthquake trigger another on the other side of the world?

The Doomsday Invention: Will Artificial Intelligence Bring Us Utopia Or Destruction?

The Doomsday Invention: Will Artificial Intelligence Bring Us Utopia Or Destruction?

Innovation, Long Reads, Science, Tech

Philosopher Nick Bostrom argues that true artificial intelligence, if it is realized, might pose a danger that exceeds every previous threat from technology—even nuclear weapons—and that if its development is not managed carefully humanity risks engineering its own extinction.

A Banana Grown At Subzero Temps Also Has An Edible Peel

A Banana Grown At Subzero Temps Also Has An Edible Peel

Food, Innovation, Nature, Science

A Japanese farm introduced a new crop this winter: an organic banana with a peel that’s thin enough to eat. In a nod to this appealing outer covering, Setsuzo Tanaka, the banana’s inventor, has named his creation the Mongee (“mon-gay”) banana — which means “incredible banana” in Japanese.

Weaponizing Biotech: How China’s Military Is Preparing For A ‘New Domain Of Warfare’

Weaponizing Biotech: How China’s Military Is Preparing For A ‘New Domain Of Warfare’

Politics, Science

Today’s advances in biotechnology and genetic engineering have exciting applications in medicine — yet also alarming implications, including for military affairs. China’s national strategy of military-civil fusion has highlighted biology as a priority, and the People’s Liberation Army could be at the forefront of expanding and exploiting this knowledge.

How Much The Public Knows About Science, And Why It Matters

How Much The Public Knows About Science, And Why It Matters

Science

A survey finds striking differences in levels of science knowledge by education and by race and ethnicity. About half of whites (48 percent) score high; by comparison, much smaller shares of Hispanics (23 percent) and blacks (9 percent) correctly answer at least nine of the questions.

Nikolay Schegolev

Inspiration
Nikolay Schegolev
Are There Bacteria In Your Brain?

Are There Bacteria In Your Brain?

Science

The brain is protected from the bacterial menagerie of the body by the blood-brain barrier, and is considered a sterile organ. Which made it all the more surprising when Rosalinda Roberts, along with Charlene Farmer and Courtney Walker, realized that the unknown objects in their slides were bacteria.

How One NASA Image Tells Dozens Of Stories

How One NASA Image Tells Dozens Of Stories

Nature, Science, Videos, World

In 2016, NASA used the Suomi NPP weather satellite to create a high resolution image of the earth at night. It can help us better understand the current developments and conflicts underway. The amount of light pollution is most severe in heavily populated areas, as well as in regions of high prosperity.

The Key To Good Luck Is An Open Mind

The Key To Good Luck Is An Open Mind

Life, Psychology, Science

What do these people have that the rest of us don’t? It turns out “ability” is the key word here. Beyond their level of privilege or the circumstances they were born into, the luckiest people may have a specific set of skills that bring chance opportunities their way.

The Dark Side Of Electronic Waste Recycling

The Dark Side Of Electronic Waste Recycling

Business, Nature, Science, Tech

Electronics can be hazardous when disposed of improperly, and the Basel Action Network, or BAN, investigates the underground world of the e-waste trade. The nonprofit group secretly embeds trackers in discarded devices, then hands them to recyclers to see where they end up, exposing bad practices in the process.

When Gravity Breaks Down

When Gravity Breaks Down

Science

Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity is more than a hundred years old, but still it gives physicists headaches. Not only are Einstein’s equations hideously difficult to solve, they also clash with physicists’ other most-cherished achievement, quantum theory.

The Metaphysics Of The Hangover

The Metaphysics Of The Hangover

Health, Science

A hangover is about being poisoned, no doubt. The toxins linger in the body and must be expelled, or waited out. We’re sick with a mini-flu and need to get better. But isn’t a hangover about more than physical toxins, at least some of the time? I’ll wager that a hangover is frequently about shame as well.

People Born Blind Are Mysteriously Protected From Schizophrenia

People Born Blind Are Mysteriously Protected From Schizophrenia

Health, Science

It was something Tom Pollak had heard whispers about—an odd factoid, referred to now and again, usually with bewilderment: No person who was born blind has ever been diagnosed with schizophrenia. Over the past 60-some years, scientists around the world have been writing about this mystery.

Michael Crichton

Inspiration
Michael Crichton
How Political Opinions Change

How Political Opinions Change

Explainers, Politics, Psychology, Science

A powerful shaping factor about our social and political worlds is how they are structured by group belonging and identities. For instance, researchers have found that moral and emotion messages on contentious political topics, such as gun-control and climate change, spread more rapidly within rather than between ideologically like-minded networks.

The Weird Power Of The Placebo Effect, Explained

The Weird Power Of The Placebo Effect, Explained

Health, Science

Placebos seem to have the greatest power over symptoms that lie at the murky boundary between the physical and psychological. Placebos seem to move the needle on pain, nausea, asthma, and phobias, with more inconsistent results for outcomes like smoking, dementia, depression*, obesity, hypertension, insomnia, and anxiety.

How A Volcano In Hawaii Became A Battleground For Astronomy

How A Volcano In Hawaii Became A Battleground For Astronomy

Long Reads, Science

Native Hawaiians are protecting the mountain of Maunakea, at the heart of Hawaii’s Big Island, from the construction of the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) at its summit, where the facility would join venerable observatories like the twin Keck domes and NASA’s Infrared Telescope Facility.

Seven Mysterious Sounds Science Has Yet To Solve

Seven Mysterious Sounds Science Has Yet To Solve

Science

Sounds of unknown origin can be more than unsettling; they can inspire decades of mythos and fear—and obsessive scientific inquiry. From jarring radio broadcasts to harmonious dunes, here are some of the world’s great sonic mysteries.

China Is Building An Artificial Sun

China Is Building An Artificial Sun

Innovation, Science

China has announced advancing plans for its nuclear fusion device known colloquially as an “artificial sun.” The extremely high temperatures of 360 million degrees Fahrenheit lead to the titular effect: literally, the nucleuses of two or more atoms are fused, and the process generates energy.

The Internet Is Destroying Our Collective Attention Span

The Internet Is Destroying Our Collective Attention Span

Health, Science, Tech

The length of time our “collective attention” is on any given event has grown shorter, and topics become popular and then drop out of public view at an accelerating rate. It’s no surprise if it feels harder and harder to dwell deeply on any topic.

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