Best Politics Articles & Videos on the internet • Discoverology

Politics

Read the best politics articles from around the internet, or watch the most insightful politics videos from platforms like Youtube, Vimeo or leading publishers like The New York Times, CNN, WSJ, The Guardian, LA Times, Washington Post and many more.

How 17 Outsize Portraits Rattled A Small Southern Town

How 17 Outsize Portraits Rattled A Small Southern Town

Art, Politics

Newnan had prided itself on its quiet charm. It offered small-town living just 40 miles southwest of Atlanta and had earned the nickname “City of Homes” for its antebellum architecture. The town decided to use art to help the community celebrate diversity and embrace change. Not everyone was ready for what they saw.

Why Ban Dollar Stores?

Why Ban Dollar Stores?

Business, Cities, Health, Politics

Dollar-discount stores get the blame for “food deserts”—neighborhoods without supermarkets. It’s claimed, these stores drive out supermarkets with their low prices and saturate poor neighborhoods with junk food. But are dollar stores really to blame for bad diets?

Life At The End Of American Empire

Life At The End Of American Empire

Economics, Politics

The 2008 crisis and the government’s response made obvious the extent of economic and political inequality in the United States, and the absolute decline in wealth and well-being for a growing fraction of Americans. Evidence of decline is manifest to those of us living in America in the first decades of the 21st century.

Donald Trump’s Worst Deal

Donald Trump’s Worst Deal

Long Reads, Politics, World

The President helped build a hotel in Azerbaijan that appears to be a corrupt operation engineered by oligarchs tied to Iran’s Revolutionary Guard. The Trump Tower Baku never opened.

The Twitter Electorate Isn’t The Real Electorate

The Twitter Electorate Isn’t The Real Electorate

Media, Politics, Tech

For anyone interested in politics, Twitter is the closest thing to a global community center, or a small-ads section—the virtual room where it happens. All of this gives the social network outsize power to shape the political conversation. However, social media is distorting our sense of mainstream opinion.

Raising The Minimum Wage By $1 May Prevent Thousands Of Suicides, Study Shows

Raising The Minimum Wage By $1 May Prevent Thousands Of Suicides, Study Shows

Economics, Health, Life, Politics

Between 1990 and 2015, raising the minimum wage by $1 in each state might have saved more than 27,000 lives, according to a report published this week in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health. An increase of $2 in each state’s minimum wage could have prevented more than 57,000 suicides.

Trump’s Art Of The Steal

Trump’s Art Of The Steal

Long Reads, Politics

How Donald Trump rode to power by parroting other people’s fringe ideas, got himself impeached for it—and might prevail anyway. Trump mines Twitter, plucking what he wants, “very comfortable with half thoughts,” “always looking for tidbits of information that he can use to his advantage.”

Davide Bonazzi

Inspiration
Davide Bonazzi
Deepfake Video: The Weaponization Of Fake News

Deepfake Video: The Weaponization Of Fake News

Media, Politics, Tech, Videos

The technology to manipulate video has become so sophisticated that words can literally be put into people’s mouths. Mark Kelley explores how it’s done and why the implications have led the U.S. Defence Department to work to protect itself against the “weaponization” of fake news.

Japan’s Yakuza: Inside The Syndicate

Japan’s Yakuza: Inside The Syndicate

Crime, Politics, Videos

With at least 50,000 members, Japan’s Yakuza gangs form one of the world’s largest criminal networks. Anton Kusters, a Belgian photographer, was allowed a rare glimpse inside a Yakuza family in early 2009. He documented the family for two years.

New York City Paid McKinsey Millions To Stem Jail Violence. Instead, Violence Soared.

New York City Paid McKinsey Millions To Stem Jail Violence. Instead, Violence Soared.

Crime, Long Reads, Politics

In April 2017, partners from McKinsey sent a confidential report to the New York City corrections commissioner. The report recounted that McKinsey had tested its new anti-violence strategy in what the firm called “Restart” housing units at Rikers. Violence had dropped more than 50% in the Restart facilities. The number was bogus.

Staring At A Digital Black Hole

Staring At A Digital Black Hole

Politics, Tech

On the morning of November 16, 2019, we, the exiled Iranians, woke up and like billions of other internet addicts in the world immediately checked our phones, only to realize that Iran had been cut off from the global internet.

The Threat To Freedom Of Expression In Japan

The Threat To Freedom Of Expression In Japan

Art, Politics

The closure of part of the 2019 Aichi Triennale reflects a broader climate of aggression, censorship and nationalist revisionism. Art is the frontline in debates around free speech precisely because it creates space for questioning values and challenging historical assumptions in public.

How One American Citizen Was Forcibly Drafted Into The South Korean Army

How One American Citizen Was Forcibly Drafted Into The South Korean Army

History, Politics

Illinois-born Young Chun thought a stint teaching English in Korea would be a quick and easy way to pay off his mounting post-college debt. He could not have been more wrong. Chun became a victim of a collision between unforgiving bureaucracy and the meddling of an unknown family member thousands of miles away.

The One-Traffic-Light Town With Some Of The Fastest Internet In The U.S.

The One-Traffic-Light Town With Some Of The Fastest Internet In The U.S.

Politics, Tech

Connecting rural America to broadband is a popular talking point on the campaign trail. In one Kentucky community, it’s already a way of life. McKee, an Appalachian town of about twelve hundred tucked into the Pigeon Roost Creek valley, is the seat of Jackson County, one of the poorest counties in the country.

At War With The Thruth

At War With The Thruth

Crime, History, Long Reads, Politics

A confidential trove of government documents obtained by The Washington Post reveals that senior U.S. officials failed to tell the truth about the war in Afghanistan throughout the 18-year campaign, making rosy pronouncements they knew to be false and hiding unmistakable evidence the war had become unwinnable.

The Rise And Fall Of Facts

The Rise And Fall Of Facts

History, Media, Politics

Because fact-checking these days is primarily the domain of legacy print publications, it retains that sheen of legitimacy and seriousness. To fact check is to assure readers, writers, and editors that great care is being taken.

Sim Jae Hyeong

Inspiration
Sim Jae Hyeong
Mapping America’s Stark Wage Inequality

Mapping America’s Stark Wage Inequality

Cities, Economics, Politics

One of the most important economic stories of the past couple of decades is the rise of economic inequality in the United States and around the world. Since 1980, economists say, wage growth for the highest-paid workers has been roughly triple that for the lowest paid. In some cities, the disparity is wider.

By Any Measure, Capital Punishment Is A Failed Policy

By Any Measure, Capital Punishment Is A Failed Policy

Crime, Politics

Nearly half of everyone sentenced to death since 1976 in the country’s active death penalty jurisdictions are no longer on death row, but not because they were executed. Hundreds have been released from prison; thousands are serving a lesser prison term.

Blood And Soil In Narendra Modi’s India

Blood And Soil In Narendra Modi’s India

Long Reads, Politics, World

The Prime Minister’s Hindu-nationalist government has cast two hundred million Muslims as internal enemies. The lack of journalistic scrutiny has given Modi immense freedom to control the narrative. Nowhere was this more apparent than in the months leading up to his reëlection.

Britain’s Secret War With Russia

Britain’s Secret War With Russia

Crime, Long Reads, Politics

From the attempted assassination of a double agent in a sleepy English city to the expulsion of scores of Russian diplomats from Western capitals, this fight would grow and morph, drawing in a chemical-weapons attack in Syria and rolling scandals about Russian sports doping.

Welcome To The Monkey House

Welcome To The Monkey House

Crime, History, Long Reads, Politics

Between the end of the Korean War and the early 1990s, more than one million Korean women were caught up in a state-controlled prostitution industry that was blessed at the highest levels by the U.S. military. They worked in special zones surrounding U.S. bases—areas licensed by the South Korean government.

Coming Out Of The Shadows: What It Means To Be French And Chinese

Coming Out Of The Shadows: What It Means To Be French And Chinese

Long Reads, Politics, World

France is home to large Vietnamese and Cambodian communities who arrived in the country in great numbers following the wars in the former French colonies in the 1970s. People of Chinese descent have long faced prejudice and violence in France. But today a new generation is staking out its rightful place in society.

How Utah Keeps The American Dream Alive

How Utah Keeps The American Dream Alive

Long Reads, Politics

Economic mobility to rival Denmark’s, but without big government. Can the rest of the U.S. emulate Utah’s success? We could offer more, and better, help to people who need it. Why not look for more promising scripts than the ones played out across the U.S. today?

The Jungle Prince Of Delhi

The Jungle Prince Of Delhi

Long Reads, Politics, World

For 40 years, journalists chronicled the eccentric royal family of Oudh, deposed aristocrats who lived in a ruined palace in the Indian capital. It was a tragic, astonishing story. But was it true?

How One Town Developed A New Way To Police

How One Town Developed A New Way To Police

Crime, Politics

Renton, Washington, has become a national model for inclusive governing. Nearly 12 years of work with its growing communities of color helped Renton and its police force defuse the racial tension that sits below the surface of much of urban America.

Hutch

Inspiration
Hutch
How Political Opinions Change

How Political Opinions Change

Explainers, Politics, Psychology, Science

A powerful shaping factor about our social and political worlds is how they are structured by group belonging and identities. For instance, researchers have found that moral and emotion messages on contentious political topics, such as gun-control and climate change, spread more rapidly within rather than between ideologically like-minded networks.

They Tried To Save The Lives Of Immigrants Fleeing Danger. Now They’re Facing Prosecution.

They Tried To Save The Lives Of Immigrants Fleeing Danger. Now They’re Facing Prosecution.

Crime, Politics, World

On the afternoon of Jan. 17, 2018, immigration agents descended on a building on the outskirts of Ajo known to be a staging area for aid workers. The agents bundled Scott Warren, an aid worker, into a vehicle and drove to the Ajo Border Patrol station. The next day, he was driven two hours to Tucson, where he was charged with three felony counts.

How America Ends

How America Ends

Politics

The United States is undergoing a transition perhaps no rich and stable democracy has ever experienced: Its historically dominant group is on its way to becoming a political minority—and its minority groups are asserting their co-equal rights and interests.

How Oxford University Shaped Brexit — And Britain’s Next Prime Minister

How Oxford University Shaped Brexit — And Britain’s Next Prime Minister

Economics, Long Reads, Politics

You turn the pages of yellowing student newspapers from 30 years ago, and there they are, recognisably the same faces that dominate today’s British news. Boris Johnson running for Union president, Michael Gove winning debating contests, Jeremy Hunt holding together the faction-ridden Oxford University Conservative Association (OUCA).

Why America Doesn’t Win Wars Anymore

Why America Doesn’t Win Wars Anymore

Explainers, Politics, World

Dominic Tierney believes the US can still successfully fight the wars of yesteryear — World War-style conflicts — but hasn’t yet mastered how to win wars against insurgents, which are smaller fights against groups within countries. The problem is the US continues to involve itself in those kinds of fights.

I Survived the Warsaw Ghetto. Here Are the Lessons I’d Like to Pass On.

I Survived the Warsaw Ghetto. Here Are the Lessons I’d Like to Pass On.

History, Politics

As a Polish Jew born in 1925, who survived the Warsaw ghetto, lost my family in the Holocaust, served in a special operations unit of the Polish underground, the Home Army, and fought in the Warsaw uprising of 1944, I know what it means to be at the sharp end of European history – and I fear that the battle to draw the right lessons from that time is in danger of being lost.

What Do We Do With Robert E. Lee?

What Do We Do With Robert E. Lee?

History, Long Reads, Politics

The president of Washington and Lee University, Will Dudley, understood the depth of his problem the moment he turned on the television and saw hoards of white men in collared shirts and khakis carrying tiki torches as they marched through Charlottesville, Virginia, protesting the removal of a statue of Robert E. Lee.

We use cookies on this website to analyse your use of our products and services, provide content from third parties and assist with our marketing efforts. Learn more about our use of cookies and available controls: cookie policy. Please be aware that your experience may be disrupted until you accept cookies.