Best Economics Articles & Videos on the internet • Discoverology

Economics

Read the best economics articles from around the internet, or watch the most insightful economics videos from platforms like Youtube, Vimeo or leading economics publishers like The Economist, Bloomberg, Quartz, Fortune and many more.

The Economics Of Cruise Ships

The Economics Of Cruise Ships

Business, Economics, Explainers

For decades, cruise companies have gone to great lengths to bypass US employment laws, hiring foreign workers for less than $2/hour. They’ve sheltered themselves as foreign entities while simultaneously benefitting from US taxpayer-funded agencies and resources.

Give Me Capitalism Or Give Me Death

Give Me Capitalism Or Give Me Death

Economics, Politics

Politicians are floating the idea that the economy supersedes the needs of living, breathing human beings; cruise and airline companies are demanding bailouts and full control over the terms; senators are doing crimes in broad daylight; and billionaire corporatists who did the same are asking regular people for money.

Why Cruise Lines Keep Cutting Their Ships In Half

Why Cruise Lines Keep Cutting Their Ships In Half

Business, Economics

In a process called “stretching,” the Star Breeze is getting pulled apart to make room for a new, 84-foot, 1,250-ton prefab midsection addition. Think of it like unsnapping (or unwelding) two Legos and putting another block in between. But with a boat.

Use A 'Fake' Location To Get Cheaper Plane Tickets

Use A 'Fake' Location To Get Cheaper Plane Tickets

Economics, Explainers

I can’t explain airline pricing but I do know some plane tickets can be cheaper depending on where you buy them or, even better, where you appear to buy them from. This is all about leveraging foreign currencies and points-of-sale to your advantage.

Why Bigger Planes Mean Cramped Quarters

Why Bigger Planes Mean Cramped Quarters

Business, Economics, Explainers

The current Boeing 737s, the world’s most flown craft, are all longer than the original by up to 45 feet. And yet, on the inside, we’re getting squeezed. That’s because more space doesn’t equal more space in Airline World. It equals more seats—and typically less room per person.

How Migration Could Make The World Richer

How Migration Could Make The World Richer

Economics, Videos

Many of the recent political shifts in the West—the election of Donald Trump, the rise of populism in Europe and Brexit—can be partially attributed to the fear of mass migration. Yet increasing migration is one of the quickest ways to make the world richer.

Nikolay Schegolev

Inspiration
Nikolay Schegolev
How The 0.001% Invest

How The 0.001% Invest

Business, Economics

Global finance is being transformed as billionaires get richer and cut out the middlemen by creating their own “family offices”, personal investment firms that roam global markets looking for opportunities.

Life At The End Of American Empire

Life At The End Of American Empire

Economics, Politics

The 2008 crisis and the government’s response made obvious the extent of economic and political inequality in the United States, and the absolute decline in wealth and well-being for a growing fraction of Americans. Evidence of decline is manifest to those of us living in America in the first decades of the 21st century.

Apollo 11 Flight Plan Final Edition

Apollo 11 Flight Plan Final Edition

Sponsored

The original “final edition” of the Apollo 11 flight plan, restored and reprinted for the 50th Anniversary of the moon landing that took place in 1969.

The Decoy Effect: How You Are Influenced To Choose Without Really Knowing It

The Decoy Effect: How You Are Influenced To Choose Without Really Knowing It

Business, Economics

The decoy effect is defined as the phenomenon whereby consumers change their preference between two options when presented with a third option – the “decoy” – that is “asymmetrically dominated”. It is also referred to as the “attraction effect” or “asymmetric dominance effect”.

Mapping America's Stark Wage Inequality

Mapping America's Stark Wage Inequality

Cities, Economics, Politics

One of the most important economic stories of the past couple of decades is the rise of economic inequality in the United States and around the world. Since 1980, economists say, wage growth for the highest-paid workers has been roughly triple that for the lowest paid. In some cities, the disparity is wider.

America Is About To Witness The Biggest Labor Movement It’s Seen In Decades

America Is About To Witness The Biggest Labor Movement It’s Seen In Decades

Business, Economics

The past four decades have been perhaps labor’s weakest since the Industrial Age. For a half-century, those working for hourly wages have won almost no real gains. The real average hourly wage in 2018 dollars adjusted for inflation was $22.65 in 2018, compared with $20.27 in 1964 — just an 11.7% gain.

The Invention Of Money

The Invention Of Money

Business, Economics, History, Long Reads

When the Venetian merchant Marco Polo got to China, he saw many wonders. One of the things that astonished him most, however, was a new invention, implemented by Kublai Khan, a grandson of the great conqueror Genghis. It was paper money, introduced by Kublai in 1260.

The End Of Economics?

The End Of Economics?

Economics

Economists have fallen in love with the supposed rigor that derives from the assumption that markets function perfectly. But the world has turned out to be more complex and unpredictable than the equations. Human beings are rarely rational—so it’s time we all stopped pretending they are.

Michael Crichton

Inspiration
Michael Crichton
The Homeownership Obsession

The Homeownership Obsession

Economics, Life

There are two different tales we tell ourselves about houses. The primary story is about bright futures, long lives, children, grandchildren, and hard-earned success. The second story, the darker story, is about the horror of being trapped.

How Air Conditioning Created The Modern City

How Air Conditioning Created The Modern City

Cities, Economics, Nature

The shopping mall would have been inconceivable without air conditioning, as would the deep-plan and glass-walled office block, as would computer servers. The expansion of tract housing in postwar suburban America relied on affordable domestic air conditioning units.

Why Airplane Boarding Got So Ridiculous

Why Airplane Boarding Got So Ridiculous

Economics, Explainers

Airlines were focused on finding the fastest possible boarding method, so planes can spend less time at gates and more time in the air, making money. They might have stuck with that aim if it weren’t for the other change, which has to do with the fight for overhead bin space.

How Africa Can Get Rich

How Africa Can Get Rich

Economics, Videos, World

Africa is changing so fast, it is becoming hard to ignore. In the short term, the continent faces many problems, but in the long term, it could rival China’s economic might. By the end of this century, Africa is set to play a much bigger role in world affairs. The Asian growth miracle is likely to slow Africa’s rapid rise could be next.

Will Upzoning Neighborhoods Make Homes More Affordable?

Will Upzoning Neighborhoods Make Homes More Affordable?

Cities, Economics, Long Reads

Housing affordability is a growing issue in America, and there’s a battle over how to fix it happening on blocks across the country. Zoning—the rules that govern how cities use their land—is on the front line. Cities and states across the country are proposing new upzoning laws to combat the housing crisis. Will they work?

The Radical Plan To Save The Planet By Working Less

The Radical Plan To Save The Planet By Working Less

Economics, Life

The degrowth movement wants to intentionally shrink the economy to address climate change, and create lives with less stuff, less work, and better well-being. This new accounting of economic success would focus on access to public services, a shorter work week, and an increase in leisure time. But is it a utopian fantasy?

Franck Bohbot

Inspiration
Franck Bohbot
The Cost Of Keeping Singapore Squeaky Clean

The Cost Of Keeping Singapore Squeaky Clean

Cities, Economics, Nature

Founding father and first Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew kicked off the Keep Singapore Clean campaign 50 years ago. The aim wasn’t just to make the city more pleasant. A cleaner city, Lee Kuan Yew reasoned, would create a stronger economy.

How America’s Biggest Theater Chains Are Exploiting Their Janitors

How America’s Biggest Theater Chains Are Exploiting Their Janitors

Art, Economics

The major chains — AMC, Regal Entertainment and Cinemark — no longer rely on teenage ushers to keep the floors from getting sticky. Instead, they have turned to a vast immigrant workforce, often hired through layers of subcontractors. That arrangement makes it almost impossible for janitors to make a living wage.

How ‘Landscape Urbanism’ Is Making Gentrification Look Like Fun

How ‘Landscape Urbanism’ Is Making Gentrification Look Like Fun

Architecture, Cities, Economics

The High Line and its imitators are examples of “landscape urbanism,” a growing design movement that places green space in collision with old infrastructure. Rehabilitation projects follow a familiar playbook, aestheticizing the labor of the past even as they support a gentrified future.

Tourism Is Eating The World

Tourism Is Eating The World

Cities, Economics, World

The number of international tourist arrivals has been increasing more or less exponentially since the mid-20th century, and totaled about 1.4 billion in 2018. Europe has seen the biggest share, but the Asia-Pacific region is growing fast.

The Complexities Of A Universal Basic Income

The Complexities Of A Universal Basic Income

Economics, Politics

“Universal basic income” was for a long time an obscure term bandied about in economics circles. That’s no longer the case. The idea, usually involving a monthly cash grant to every person with no strings attached, has entered mainstream discourse. Small programs hint at how it might work — or not — on a national scale.

Sitzfleisch: The German Concept To Get More Work Done

Sitzfleisch: The German Concept To Get More Work Done

Business, Economics

To have sitzfleisch means the ability to sit still for the long periods of time required to be truly productive; it means the stamina to work through a difficult situation and see a project through to the end. Angela Merkel has it in abundance – how do you cultivate this crucial skill?

What Does A Cashless Future Mean?

What Does A Cashless Future Mean?

Economics, Politics, Videos

Operating in cash costs countries about 0.5% of their GDP every year. But cost isn’t the only incentive to move towards a cashless future. Many countries are going cashless at great speed. What are the advantages of ditching hard cash and what are the dangers?

How McKinsey Destroyed The Middle Class

How McKinsey Destroyed The Middle Class

Business, Economics

Consultants seek to legitimate both the job cuts and the explosion of elite pay. Rather than simply improving management, to make American corporations lean and fit, they fostered hierarchy, making management, in David Gordon’s memorable phrase, “fat and mean.”

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