Who Invented The Wheel? And How Did They Do It? • Discoverology

Who Invented The Wheel? And How Did They Do It?

wired.com
11m read

The wagon—and the wagon wheel—could not have been put together in stages. Either it works, or it doesn’t. And it enabled humans to spread rapidly into huge parts of the world.

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