World's First City Discovered By U.S. Spy Satellite • Discoverology

World’s First City Discovered By U.S. Spy Satellite

History, Videos, World

Old U.S. spy satellite images of the Middle East have unearthed a stunning discovery: the world’s first city, Tell Brak – 4,000 years older than the Great Pyramids. Where Tell Brak lies is an area of the Middle East known as the Fertile Crescent.

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