Best World Articles & Videos on the internet • Discoverology

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Read the best world and travel articles from around the internet, or watch the most insightful world videos from platforms like Youtube, Vimeo or leading world publishers like BBC, The New York Times, The Guardian, Atlas Obscura, Washington Post and many more.

The Italian Town That Always Smells Like Panettone

The Italian Town That Always Smells Like Panettone

Food, World

Since 1922, Pinerolo has been home to Galup, a bakery-factory that specializes in northern Italian enriched breads, an operation that defines this small town—from its aroma to its employment options. The town always smells like panettone.

Singapore Is Building A City In China

Singapore Is Building A City In China

Cities, Videos, World

It’s located in Southern China but it’s actually a partnership between China and Singapore. It’s called, Sino-Singapore Guangzhou Knowledge City, or SSGKC. In the next 20 years, the countries project it will have a population of 500,000. A whopping figure considering the farmlands were formerly home to just 40,000 residents.

When Antarctica Was Green

When Antarctica Was Green

Nature, Videos, World

Before the start of the Eocene Epoch about 56 million years ago–Antarctica was still joined to both Australia and South America. And it turns out that a lot of what we recognize about the southern hemisphere can be traced back to that time when Antarctica was green.

Bashir Sultani

Inspiration
Bashir Sultani
Blood And Soil In Narendra Modi’s India

Blood And Soil In Narendra Modi’s India

Long Reads, Politics, World

The Prime Minister’s Hindu-nationalist government has cast two hundred million Muslims as internal enemies. The lack of journalistic scrutiny has given Modi immense freedom to control the narrative. Nowhere was this more apparent than in the months leading up to his reëlection.

Who Killed Two Journalists In Ukraine? And Why?

Who Killed Two Journalists In Ukraine? And Why?

Crime, Long Reads, World

An investigation and trial has answered some of the questions about what happened to Andrei Mironov and the Italian photographer he was accompanying. Yet so much remains uncertain. Theirs is a story of the murky nature of facts in a war zone. It’s a story of elusive moral clarity in a land where death comes from who knows where.

The Fukushima Surf Revival

The Fukushima Surf Revival

Long Reads, World

“If Fukushima was a book, the cover would be about radiation. But the contents would be totally different. Of course, people never read the contents.” How surfing was revived alongside a community in the wake of a tsunami and nuclear disaster.

China's Man-Made Forest In The Desert

China's Man-Made Forest In The Desert

Nature, Videos, World

In 1986, the city of Aksu in China’s Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region began an ambitious tree-planting project that looked to turn swaths of desert into forest. The result was over 13 million acres of green that became the Kekeya greening project.

The Totally Isolated Tribe Of The Andaman

The Totally Isolated Tribe Of The Andaman

Videos, World

There are still people in this world who have no idea that civilization exists. On remote islands in the Bay of Bengal live mysterious tribes. Their origins are mysterious, but this film reveals how modern DNA analysis suggests that these ancient people have close links to Africa, from where they have been separated for 100,000 years.

The 'Lost Rambos' Of Papua New Guinea: How Weapons And Hollywood Changed Tribal Disputes

The 'Lost Rambos' Of Papua New Guinea: How Weapons And Hollywood Changed Tribal Disputes

Crime, Videos, World

Tribal fighting has long been present in the Papua New Guinea highlands, but the influx of modern automatic weaponry in the 1990s turned local disputes into lethal exchanges. Bootleg copies of the American film Rambo circulated in remote communities, becoming a crude tutorial on the use of such weaponry.

Chasing Colombia’s ‘Cocaine Hippos’

Chasing Colombia’s ‘Cocaine Hippos’

Nature, World

After the Colombian National Police killed Escobar in 1993, zoos and private collectors acquired the animals, all except the hippopotamuses. They are only hippos in the wild outside Africa. Escobar started with four hippos. Today, a UC San Diego biologist estimates there are 80 to 100.

Nikolay Schegolev

Inspiration
Nikolay Schegolev
Malaysia's $100BN Smart Island City

Malaysia's $100BN Smart Island City

Architecture, Cities, Videos, World

In an effort to further boost its economy and leverage its unique position on the doorstep of Singapore, Malaysia are raising four artificial islands from the waters of the Johor Strait and constructing a USD $100BN smart city from scratch.

China's Vanishing Mosques

China's Vanishing Mosques

Videos, World

The BBC has found new evidence of the increasing control and suppression of Islam in China’s far western region of Xinjiang – including the widespread destruction of mosques. Authorities provided rare access to religious sites and senior Islamic officials to support their claim that their policies only target violent religious extremism, not faith itself.

The Italian Village That Celebrates Ugliness

The Italian Village That Celebrates Ugliness

Videos, World

Celebrating “ugliness” for the past 140 years, Piobbico has become renowned for being the world capital of ugly people. Now, its utopian idea has blossomed into a worldwide movement. Today, the so-called “World Association of Ugly People” counts more than 30,000 members across 25 global chapters.

A Dictator's Birthday Present To Himself

A Dictator's Birthday Present To Himself

History, Videos, World

In 1968, Albanian Communist dictator Enver Hoxha did what any leader espousing equality among all people would naturally do. He demanded his name be written into a mountain. It was a birthday present that he was giving himself.

Highly Secretive Iranian Rebels Are Holed Up in Albania. They Gave Us a Tour.

Highly Secretive Iranian Rebels Are Holed Up in Albania. They Gave Us a Tour.

Politics, World

In a valley in the Albanian countryside, a group of celibate Iranian dissidents have built a vast and tightly guarded barracks that few outsiders have ever entered. Depending on whom you ask, the Mujahedeen Khalq, or People’s Jihadists, are either Iran’s replacement government-in-waiting or a duplicitous terrorist cult.

How India's Richest Man Fought To Build An Empire

How India's Richest Man Fought To Build An Empire

Business, World

Mukesh and Anil Ambani inherited their father’s fortune. But while Mukesh’s wealth made him India’s richest man, his brother’s net worth tumbled to less than $2B. The story of their diverging fortunes is steeped in a family feud that has captivated India for over a decade.

The Problem With Being A Long-Term Expat

The Problem With Being A Long-Term Expat

Life, Psychology, World

People on long-term foreign assignments often find it hard to adjust once they return home. Many leave their company within a few years, and some leave the country entirely. Long absences can play havoc with a person’s sense of identity, a feeling that is intensified by the length of time away and how often they visit home.

The World's Last Great Undiscovered Cuisine

The World's Last Great Undiscovered Cuisine

Food, World

Baku, the capital city of Azerbaijan is home to a fantastical rising skyline, rose-scented markets, and cooking influenced by everything from the Ottoman Empire to the USSR. You’ll dine on fisinjan and other saucy (though un-nailed) stews called khurush, along with ethereal pilafs bejeweled with dried fruits, nuts, and barberries.

Aogashima, Tokyo's Secret Island Paradise

Aogashima, Tokyo's Secret Island Paradise

Videos, World

Aogashima Island is famous for having a volcano inside a volcano surrounded by dense jungle. It’s also considered the smallest town in Japan and the hardest place in Japan to get to. There is no direct transportation to Aogashima.

Michael Crichton

Inspiration
Michael Crichton
Ferry Tales In Japan

Ferry Tales In Japan

Photos, World

Far removed from the ultra-fast Shinkansens and myriad of metro lines that dominate Japan’s major cities, photographer Arnaud Montagard focuses his lens on a much more leisurely commute – Japan’s ferries.

How Inuit Parents Teach Kids To Control Their Anger

How Inuit Parents Teach Kids To Control Their Anger

Life, Psychology, World

Back in the 1960s, a Harvard graduate student made a landmark discovery about the nature of human anger. There were no roads, no heating systems, no grocery stores. Winter temperatures could easily dip below minus 40 degrees Fahrenheit. Briggs persuaded an Inuit family to “adopt” her and “try to keep her alive.”

The Man Who Walked Backward

The Man Who Walked Backward

History, Long Reads, World

When the Great Depression put Plennie Wingo’s bustling Abilene, Texas, cafe out of business, he tried to find fame, fortune, and a sense of meaning the only way he knew how: by embarking on an audacious trip around the world on foot. In reverse.

Behind The Chinese Internet Wall

Behind The Chinese Internet Wall

Tech, World

What is happening on the other side of the barrier? There we find people who respond to state controls with creativity and spunk. While some spend their days trawling cat videos, others create oases of subversion within the reality that they’ve been dealt.

Young Refugees Document The Squalor, And Hope, Around Them

Young Refugees Document The Squalor, And Hope, Around Them

Photos, World

More than 4,100 refugees live in Samos Reception and Identification Center in Greece, a compound built for 650, awaiting their fate. Some have been here for years, and they include people from dozens of nations across the Middle East, Central Asia and Africa. They also include some 1,200 children, many of them unaccompanied minors.

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