William Eggleston’s Colorful Photographs Of The Everyday Shocked the Art World • Discoverology

William Eggleston’s Colorful Photographs Of The Everyday Shocked the Art World

Art, History

The self-taught, Memphis-born photographer William Eggleston was making vivid images of mundane scenes at a time when the only photographs considered to be art were in black and white — color photography was typically reserved for punchy advertising campaigns, not fine art.

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