Why We Shouldn’t Bail Out The Airlines And Cruise Companies • Discoverology

Why We Shouldn’t Bail Out The Airlines And Cruise Companies

Business, Economics, Politics

Despite the obvious vulnerability of the sector, boards/CEOs of the six largest airlines have spent 96% of their free cash flow on share buybacks, bolstering the share price and compensation of management… who now want a bailout. They should be allowed to fail.

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