Why US Economists Are Obsessed With 'Japanification' • Discoverology

Why US Economists Are Obsessed With ‘Japanification’

Economists are terrified of how slow growth, low inflation and low interest rates could hit the economy. The Financial Times’ US economics editor Brendan Greeley explains why.

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