Why Fashion Is Worse Than Flying • Discoverology

Why Fashion Is Worse Than Flying

Nature

The fashion industry accounts for about 10% of global carbon emissions, and nearly 20% of wastewater. And while the environmental impact of flying is now well known, fashion sucks up more energy than both aviation and shipping combined.

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