Why Do Smart People Do Foolish Things? • Discoverology

Why Do Smart People Do Foolish Things?

Psychology, Science

Intelligence is not the same as critical thinking—and the difference matters. Most intelligence tests fail to capture real-world decision-making and our ability to interact well with others. This is why “smart” people do “dumb” things.

Related tags
Related posts
What We Know About Mental Fatigue

What We Know About Mental Fatigue

Life, Psychology

A temporary and localized fuel shortage triggers a rise in adenosine levels, which in turn blocks the release of neurotransmitters like dopamine. The result is a rise in perception of effort and a decrease in motivation—in other words, a feeling of mental fatigue.

3D Printing Ink May Solve The “Toothpaste Problem”

3D Printing Ink May Solve The “Toothpaste Problem”

Innovation, Science

A new kind of ink for 3D printing liquifies when pressed through the nozzle of a 3D printer, but then quickly returns to its original shape, researchers report. The invention paves the way for personalized biomaterial implants, according to new research. As things stand, however, personalized implants remain a long way off.

The Hypersane Are Among Us, If Only We Are Prepared to Look

The Hypersane Are Among Us, If Only We Are Prepared to Look

Life, Psychology

Hypersane people are calm, contained and constructive. It is not just that the ‘sane’ are irrational but that they lack scope and range, as though they’ve grown into the prisoners of their arbitrary lives, locked up in their own dark and narrow subjectivity.

Korvaa Is The World’s First Headphones “Grown” From Bio-based Materials

Korvaa Is The World’s First Headphones “Grown” From Bio-based Materials

Design, Innovation, Science, Tech

Helsinki-based multidisciplinary design studio Aivan recently unveiled Korvaa, the world’s first headphones made exclusively from microbially grown materials. Created using synbio, Korvaa is the first physical implementation of the technology and marks a potential shift away from a fossil fuel-based economy.

What Facial Recognition Steals From Us

What Facial Recognition Steals From Us

Science, Tech, Videos

In just the past five years, the meaning of the human face has quietly but seismically shifted. That’s because researchers at Facebook, Google, and other institutions have nearly perfected techniques for automated facial recognition.

How Political Opinions Change

How Political Opinions Change

Explainers, Politics, Psychology, Science

A powerful shaping factor about our social and political worlds is how they are structured by group belonging and identities. For instance, researchers have found that moral and emotion messages on contentious political topics, such as gun-control and climate change, spread more rapidly within rather than between ideologically like-minded networks.

Is Sunscreen The New Margarine?

Is Sunscreen The New Margarine?

Health, Science

A rogue band of researchers argues that what made the people with high vitamin D levels so healthy was not the vitamin itself. Their vitamin D levels were high because they were getting plenty of exposure to the thing that was really responsible for their good health—that big orange ball shining down from above.

Are You Really The ‘Real’ You?

Are You Really The ‘Real’ You?

Health, Life, Psychology

What rational cogs are turning for people when they change their minds about who they are? Are beliefs about ourselves even the kind of thing we can be rational about, when we’re the ones who make those beliefs true?

Confirmation Bias: Why You Make Terrible Life Choices

Confirmation Bias: Why You Make Terrible Life Choices

Life, Psychology

Confirmation bias is the human tendency to seek, interpret and remember information that confirms pre-existing beliefs. It is insidious. It affects every choice you make. Every. Single. Day. The things you choose to buy, your health, who you choose to marry, your career, your emotions, and your finances.

The True Toll Of The Chernobyl Disaster

The True Toll Of The Chernobyl Disaster

Health, History, Science

On 26 April 1986 reactor number four at the power plant suffered a catastrophic explosion that exposed the core and threw clouds of radioactive material over the surrounding. Covered up by a secretive Soviet Union at the time, the true number of deaths and illnesses caused by the nuclear accident are only now becoming clear.

How Not To Care When People Don’t Like You

How Not To Care When People Don’t Like You

Life, Psychology

When you’re not wasting energy molding your personality to someone else’s to be accepted, you’re more likely to find people who genuinely like you for you, and those relationships are far less exhausting to keep up. Still, it sucks to feel disliked. Here’s how to get through it without falling down a rabbit hole of sadness.

Treasure Fever

Treasure Fever

Long Reads, Nature, Science

Cape Canaveral contains one of the greatest concentrations of colonial shipwrecks in the world. The discovery of a legendary, lost shipwreck in North America has pitted treasure hunters and archaeologists against each other, raising questions about who should control sunken riches.

Emotional Intelligence: The Social Skills You Weren’t Taught in School

Emotional Intelligence: The Social Skills You Weren’t Taught in School

Health, Life, Psychology

How much of what you learned in school do you still remember? Even more importantly, how much of it do you actually use on a daily basis? Most of us aren’t taught how to identify or deal with our own emotions, or the emotions of others. These skills can be valuable, but you’ll never get them in a classroom.

The Benefits Of Optimism Are Real

The Benefits Of Optimism Are Real

Health, Psychology

People who are resilient tend to be more positive and optimistic compared with less resilient folks; they are better able to regulate their emotions, and they are able to maintain their optimism through the most trying circumstances.

What Separates Champions From ‘Almost Champions’?

What Separates Champions From ‘Almost Champions’?

Health, Life, Psychology

For a recent study published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology, talent development researchers Dave Collins, Áine MacNamara, and Neil McCarthy examined the differences between athletes who overcame adversity and went on to become world-class and those who struggled in the face of hardship.

We use cookies on this website to analyse your use of our products and services, provide content from third parties and assist with our marketing efforts. Learn more about our use of cookies and available controls: cookie policy. Please be aware that your experience may be disrupted until you accept cookies.