Why A Struggling Rust Belt City Pinned Its Revival On A Self-chilling Beverage Can • Discoverology

Why A Struggling Rust Belt City Pinned Its Revival On A Self-chilling Beverage Can

Business, Food, Long Reads

Welcome to Youngstown, Ohio, home of Chill-Can, the self-chilling beverage container you’ve probably never heard of. Officials have gambled millions of dollars and demolished a neighborhood for the product. Not one job has been created yet.

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