What It's Like To Live Next To America's Largest Coal Plant • Discoverology

What It’s Like To Live Next To America’s Largest Coal Plant

grist.org
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By the late 1960s, Georgia Power had started planning to build the Robert W. Scherer Power Plant. Over a decade later, in 1982, its first unit opened in Juliette. Now, residents worry it’s contaminating their water.

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