What Happened When Tulsa Paid People To Work Remotely • Discoverology

What Happened When Tulsa Paid People To Work Remotely

Business, Long Reads

Traditionally, cities looking to spur their economies may offer incentives to attract businesses. Tulsa is testing out a new premise: Pay people instead. The first class of hand-picked remote workers moved to Tulsa in exchange for $10,000 and a built-in community. The city might just be luring them to stay.

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