What Ever Happened To Waterbeds? • Discoverology

What Ever Happened To Waterbeds?

After a heyday in the late 1980s in which nearly one out of every four mattresses sold was a waterbed mattress, the industry dried up in the 1990s, leaving behind a sense of unfilled promise and thousands upon thousands of unsold vinyl shells.

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