There Is No Reason to Cross the U.S. by Train. But I Did It Anyway. • Discoverology

There Is No Reason to Cross the U.S. by Train. But I Did It Anyway.

nytimes.com
83m read

Tell your fellow Americans that you plan to cross the United States by train, and their reactions will range from amusement at your spellbinding eccentricity to naked horror that they, through some fatal social miscalculation, have become acquainted with a person who would plan to cross the United States by train.

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