To Defy The United States, Fidel Castro Built The World’s Greatest Ice Cream Parlor • Discoverology

To Defy The United States, Fidel Castro Built The World’s Greatest Ice Cream Parlor

When the United States announced a total embargo in 1962, cutting Cuba off from the American dairy market, Castro found himself the leader of a milk-free island that was too warm for dairy cows. Undaunted, he demanded, in 1966, the construction of the greatest ice cream parlor the world had ever seen. Visitors to Havana can still eat there today.

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