Tiny Houses Look Marvellous But Have A Dark Side • Discoverology

Tiny Houses Look Marvellous But Have A Dark Side

Architecture, Design

Tiny houses are often put forward as a more sustainable housing option. They are certainly a potential check on the continued pursuit of bigger houses and greater consumption of energy, building materials and so forth. Yet reducing your environmental impact by going tiny is not as simple as some have claimed.

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