These Haunting Red Dresses Memorialize Murdered And Missing Indigenous Women • Discoverology

These Haunting Red Dresses Memorialize Murdered And Missing Indigenous Women

Art, Crime

The red dresses each hung, flapping in the wind along the plaza surrounding the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian—35 of them—in different shapes, sizes and shades. They serve as stand-ins for the potentially thousands of native women who go missing or are murdered each year.

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