These Death-Defying Human Towers Build On Catalan Tradition • Discoverology

These Death-Defying Human Towers Build On Catalan Tradition

Videos, World

Catalonia is ruled by the Spanish government, but its people have been constructing independent kingdoms for centuries. By climbing up backs and balancing on shoulders, Catalonians of all ages stack their bodies on-top each other to build castells, or human towers.

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