The Tech Giants Are Coming For Our Homes • Discoverology

The Tech Giants Are Coming For Our Homes

Tech, Videos

The likes of Amazon, Google, Samsung, Apple and others are all competing for smart home dominance – but what drove so many of us to invite these multinational corporations into the highly personal spaces where we live?

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Korvaa Is The World’s First Headphones “Grown” From Bio-based Materials

Korvaa Is The World’s First Headphones “Grown” From Bio-based Materials

Design, Innovation, Science, Tech

Helsinki-based multidisciplinary design studio Aivan recently unveiled Korvaa, the world’s first headphones made exclusively from microbially grown materials. Created using synbio, Korvaa is the first physical implementation of the technology and marks a potential shift away from a fossil fuel-based economy.

Why Government Websites Fail

Why Government Websites Fail

Tech

While the rest of the world has evolved to a place where we can track anything at all times and order anything from anywhere, government has been hopelessly stranded on an island in 1993.

“Locker Room”, Thought-Provoking Short Film About Teenage Friendships

“Locker Room”, Thought-Provoking Short Film About Teenage Friendships

Videos

A teenage girl discovers her male friends’ secret group chat, forcing her to question her friendship with them. Through the lens of neither a perpetrator or survivor, Locker Room draws attention to the social responsibility of bystanders to bad behavior and the pressures that can cause them to turn a blind eye.

Charity: How Effective Is Giving?

Charity: How Effective Is Giving?

Business, Videos

Philanthropists are putting record sums into tackling the world’s most pressing problems. And unlike the mega-donors of the past today’s philanthropists want to see the results in their lifetimes. But how altruistic is this new golden age of giving? Have these mega-donors become too powerful?

The Dark Side Of Electronic Waste Recycling

The Dark Side Of Electronic Waste Recycling

Business, Nature, Science, Tech

Electronics can be hazardous when disposed of improperly, and the Basel Action Network, or BAN, investigates the underground world of the e-waste trade. The nonprofit group secretly embeds trackers in discarded devices, then hands them to recyclers to see where they end up, exposing bad practices in the process.

The ‘Lost Rambos’ Of Papua New Guinea: How Weapons And Hollywood Changed Tribal Disputes

The ‘Lost Rambos’ Of Papua New Guinea: How Weapons And Hollywood Changed Tribal Disputes

Crime, Videos, World

Tribal fighting has long been present in the Papua New Guinea highlands, but the influx of modern automatic weaponry in the 1990s turned local disputes into lethal exchanges. Bootleg copies of the American film Rambo circulated in remote communities, becoming a crude tutorial on the use of such weaponry.

The Contrepreneur Formula Exposed

The Contrepreneur Formula Exposed

Videos

People are getting rich selling crap online courses because you believe there is some kind of secret formula to create passive income. In this video, Mike Winnet explains the science behind the CONtrepreneur formula. He spent 6 months buying their courses and attending their events so you don’t have to.

Dracula Bosses Erect Billboard That Comes To Life At Night

Dracula Bosses Erect Billboard That Comes To Life At Night

Design, Media, Videos

The BBC decided to give Dracula fans a fright with two billboards of the show that come to life at night. A shadow of the infamous vampire appears in the center of the advert, which looks as though it has been cast by a number of wooden stakes plunged into the advert.

“Hair Love”, Oscar-Winning Animated Short Film

“Hair Love”, Oscar-Winning Animated Short Film

Videos

Hair Love, an Oscar-winning animated short film from ex-NFL football player Matthew A. Cherry, tells the heartfelt story of an African American father learning to do his daughter’s hair for the first time.

The Secret History Of Facial Recognition

The Secret History Of Facial Recognition

History, Long Reads, Tech

Sixty years ago, a sharecropper’s son invented a technology to identify faces. Then the record of his role all but vanished. He died on October 4, 1995. His obituary in the Austin American-Statesman made no mention of his work on facial recognition. Who was Woody Bledsoe, and who was he working for?

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Portrait Of A Place: Steel Town

Videos

Capable of producing nearly five million tonnes of steel each year, the steelworks in Port Talbot, South Wales is the UK’s largest—and it’s currently losing £1 million each day. Here, London-based director Robin Mason talks about his portrait of the town at a vital moment in its history.

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Architecture, Videos

The property was owned by a business since the early Meiji era but when business declined, so did the buildings in the 1970s. The property holder refused to give up the land, even though new building permits had been refused to him. The highway corporation and the property owner negotiated for 5 years and what you see today is their compromise.

How The Resale Revolution Is Reshaping Fashion

How The Resale Revolution Is Reshaping Fashion

Business, Videos

We’re buying more clothes than ever, but it’s not all fast fashion. More than half of 25- to 34-year-olds buy secondhand or vintage clothes, and resale apps such as Depop, Stock X and Vestiaire Collective are tapping into the millennial and generation Z market.

Digital Technology Is Not To Blame For Our Hyperfast Lives

Digital Technology Is Not To Blame For Our Hyperfast Lives

Life, Psychology, Tech

Life in the 21st century, we are told, is faster than ever. Time is scarce, the pace of everyday life is accelerating, and everyone complains about how busy they are. For all the smart tech, we still feel pressed for time. Are digital services the problem, or are we humans to blame?

Human Population Through Time

Human Population Through Time

Explainers, Videos, World

It took 200,000 years for our human population to reach 1 billion—and only 200 years to reach 7 billion. But growth has begun slowing, as women have fewer babies on average. When will our global population peak? And how can we minimize our impact on Earth’s resources, even as we approach 11 billion?

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