The State Of Qatar’s Hack Of Democracies: A Global Cyber-Crime Operation • Discoverology

The State Of Qatar’s Hack Of Democracies: A Global Cyber-Crime Operation

In one of the largest state-sponsored computer hacks ever detected, Qatar’s proxies cyberattacked more than 1,400 high-status and ordinary citizens who were exercising their free-speech rights in democracies across North America, the Middle East, Asia and Europe, according to U.S. court filings.

Related topics
Related posts
Why Government Websites Fail

Why Government Websites Fail

Tech

While the rest of the world has evolved to a place where we can track anything at all times and order anything from anywhere, government has been hopelessly stranded on an island in 1993.

The Stradivarius Affair

The Stradivarius Affair

Crime Long Reads

It isn’t every day that a street criminal—a high-school dropout with two felony convictions—is accused of stealing a centuries-old violin worth as much as $6 million. But nothing about the heist of the Lipinski Stradivarius, which galvanized the music world last winter, was normal, or even logical.

A New Start-Up Wants To Use AI To Replace “Expensive, Architect-Designed” Homes

A New Start-Up Wants To Use AI To Replace “Expensive, Architect-Designed” Homes

Architecture Design Innovation Tech

Tech start-up Higharc aims to “reinvent home design for the digital age.” The company uses iterative design to create “custom” 3D models and plans. Algorithmic design isn’t new to architecture, but it looks like Higharc seeks to do away with “expensive, architect-designed plans that take forever to produce.”

The Unraveling Of America

The Unraveling Of America

Economics Long Reads Politics

If and when the Chinese are ascendant, with their concentration camps for the Uighurs, the ruthless reach of their military, their 200 million surveillance cameras watching every move and gesture of their people, we will surely long for the best years of the American century.

Iraq’s Social Media Martyrs

Iraq’s Social Media Martyrs

Crime Media Videos World

Huge nationwide protests against corruption have been making headlines, but these young millennials are taking on power in a different way, by celebrating beauty, fashion and rap. They’ve got millions of followers, but, as Unreported World finds out, fame can have deadly consequences.

Google And Amazon Are Now In The Oil Business

Google And Amazon Are Now In The Oil Business

Business Tech Videos

Google, Microsoft, and Amazon have been very vocal about their efforts to reduce the world’s dependence on fossil fuels. But as The Wall Street Journal has reported, these same companies are currently teaming up with fossil fuel industry to help them squeeze as much oil and gas out of the ground as possible.

How Eliud Kipchoge Broke Running’s Mythic Barrier

How Eliud Kipchoge Broke Running’s Mythic Barrier

Long Reads

It was one of sport’s great question marks: Is it humanly possible to run 26.2 miles in under two hours? Then Eliud Kipchoge did it. What followed was international fame—and plenty of controversy. GQ flew to Kipchoge’s ultra-rarefied Kenyan training ground to meet the man who pulled off the impossible.

The Criminalization Of The American Midwife

The Criminalization Of The American Midwife

Health Long Reads

New York midwife Elizabeth Catlin faces 95 individual felony counts at her upcoming trial. For what? For doing her job. Politics and patriarchy make the work of many credentialed, experienced midwives illegal — to the detriment of women and underserved communities.

The Last Days Of John Allen Chau

The Last Days Of John Allen Chau

Crime Long Reads Nature World

In the fall of 2018, the 26-year-old American missionary traveled to a remote speck of sand and jungle in the Indian Ocean, attempting to convert one of the planet’s last uncontacted tribes to Christianity. The islanders killed him, and Chau was pilloried around the world as a deluded Christian supremacist who deserved to die.

‘It’s Been Hell’: Inside The Town Where Trumpers Are Building A Private Wall

‘It’s Been Hell’: Inside The Town Where Trumpers Are Building A Private Wall

Long Reads Politics

Either as a demonstration of loyalty to the president or, in the case of one developer, a bid for lucrative government contracts, some private citizens are furiously erecting their own barriers along the Southwest border. The latest iteration, the three-and-a-half-mile Rio Grande Valley wall, is now nearly complete.

VW Car2X: Networked Driving Comes To Real Life

VW Car2X: Networked Driving Comes To Real Life

Innovation Tech

Volkswagen Car2X technology warns the driver of problems such as roadside breakdowns, the end of a traffic jam or the location of an accident. But also emergency braking situations: if a driver slams on the brakes, other vehicles are informed of sudden braking maneuvers by other traffic participants.

Tech’s Most Controversial Startup Makes Drone-Killing Robots

Tech’s Most Controversial Startup Makes Drone-Killing Robots

Tech Videos

Founded by Palmer Luckey and backed by Peter Thiel, Anduril is rekindling the connection between the American military and Silicon Valley. The company’s surveillance technology consists of large towers, packed with sensors, and small surveillance drones that can be set up to guard the perimeter.

What Brought Beyoncé, U2, And BTS To Amish Country?

What Brought Beyoncé, U2, And BTS To Amish Country?

Long Reads

Rock Lititz is a one-of-a-kind production community in Amish Country. They aim to be a one-stop shop for major bands: They build the stage, they design the lighting, they do the sound, and after a couple days or a week or a month of rehearsals, they send you off to tour the world.

What Happens After Stealing A Van Gogh Painting

What Happens After Stealing A Van Gogh Painting

Art Crime

Thieves stole an 1884 oil painting by Vincent van Gogh called “The Parsonage Garden at Nuenen in Spring” from the Singer Laren art museum near Amsterdam. What do the criminals do with a stolen painting, and how could they get caught?

Japan’s Yakuza: Inside The Syndicate

Japan’s Yakuza: Inside The Syndicate

Crime Politics Videos

With at least 50,000 members, Japan’s Yakuza gangs form one of the world’s largest criminal networks. Anton Kusters, a Belgian photographer, was allowed a rare glimpse inside a Yakuza family in early 2009. He documented the family for two years.

We use cookies on this website to analyse your use of our products and services, provide content from third parties and assist with our marketing efforts. Learn more about our use of cookies and available controls: cookie policy. Please be aware that your experience may be disrupted until you accept cookies.