The Shipwrecked Sailors And The Wandering Cod • Discoverology

The Shipwrecked Sailors And The Wandering Cod

saveur.com
13m read

In the remote archipelago of Lofoten, Arctic cod have been dried on oceanfront racks since the age of the Vikings. This is the unlikely story of how the humble fish became king of Norway.

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