The Secret History Of A Cold War Mastermind • Discoverology

The Secret History Of A Cold War Mastermind

History, Long Reads

The legend of Gus Weiss, hero of the Cold War, ends 11 stories below the balcony of his condo at the Watergate complex in Washington, DC, on November 25, 2003. A broken corpse on the sidewalk. He was a shrewd intelligence insider, pulled off an audacious tech hack against the Soviets in the last century. Or did he?

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