The Roman Wall That Split Britain Into Two Parts • Discoverology

The Roman Wall That Split Britain Into Two Parts

History, Videos, World

Hadrian’s Wall was a 73 mile barrier stretching from coast to coast, splitting the warlike north of Britain from the more docile south. It was the Roman Empire’s way of imposing peace in a hostile land.

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