The Remote 'Democratic' Oasis Of Soviet Russia • Discoverology

The Remote ‘Democratic’ Oasis Of Soviet Russia

History, Politics, Videos, World

The academic town of Akademgorodok in Siberia was created by Russian mathematician Mikhaïl Alekseïevitch Lavrentiev, who wanted to install a safe haven for scientists in the middle of Siberia. Such isolation from Moscow created a fertile scientific and cultural nest away from the influence of the State and its politics.

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