The Peruvian Corruption-Buster Bigger Than Mueller • Discoverology

The Peruvian Corruption-Buster Bigger Than Mueller

History, Politics

With his implacable pursuit of the presidential trio, the corruption-busting prosecutor José Domingo Pérez has established an international template for how to prosecute former heads of state on graft charges.

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