History, Politics

The Peruvian Corruption-Buster Bigger Than Mueller

With his implacable pursuit of the presidential trio, the corruption-busting prosecutor José Domingo Pérez has established an international template for how to prosecute former heads of state on graft charges.

History

The Forgotten History Of Greensboro’s A&T/Dudley Revolt

In May 1969, a controversial election for student body president at Dudley High School in Greensboro, North Carolina, turned into an open revolt against police repression and racial segregation.

Cities, History

How Philadelphia Became “The First City That Bombed Itself”

In 1985, an armed standoff between Philadelphia police and members of a radical black liberation group, resulted in the deaths of eleven people. No police officers or city officials were ever charged for their role in what’s known as the MOVE bombing.

History, Media

Psychiatry, Racism, And The Birth Of ‘Sesame Street’

How an African-American psychiatrist helped design a groundbreaking television show as a radical therapeutic tool for helping minority preschoolers.

History

Why The Brazilian Soccer Team Wouldn’t Wear White – Until Now

White is also the color that the Brazilian national soccer team was wearing in the infamous “Maracanazo” match, a decisive showdown against Uruguay in the 1950 World Cup. Nearly 70 years later Brazil is ready to tempt fate.

History, Photos

100 Years Ago In Photos: A Look Back At 1919

A century ago, the Treaty of Versailles was signed, as much of the world was still recovering from the devastation of World War I. Rebuilding was just beginning, refugees were returning home, orphans were being cared for, and a global influenza outbreak was being battled.

Crime, History, Politics

Who Killed Sweden’s Prime Minister?

Three decades ago, Olof Palme was assassinated on Stockholm’s busiest street. The killer has never been found. Could the discovery of new evidence finally close the case?

History, Videos

“Balloonfest”, The Spectacle That Became A Tragedy

In September 1986, the city of Cleveland attempted to set a special record: the simultaneous launch of 1.5 million balloons. But fate intervened, and the result was both crazier and more tragic than anyone could have imagined.

Economics, Life, Politics

How Our Definition Of Middle Class Has–And Hasn’t–Changed In 100 Years

Some of the cultural markers associated with the middle class–like education–have shifted. But its aspirations? Not so much.

History, World

How Half A Tonne Of Cocaine Transformed The Life Of An Island

In 2001, a smugglers’ yacht washed up in the Azores and disgorged its contents. The island of São Miguel was quickly flooded with high-grade cocaine – and nearly 20 years on, it is still feeling the effects.

Politics

The ‘3.5% Rule’: How A Small Minority Can Change The World

Nonviolent protests are twice as likely to succeed as armed conflicts – and those engaging a threshold of 3.5% of the population have never failed to bring about change.

Art, History

A Secret Cupid Is Emerging From A 17th-Century Vermeer

During a routine round of conservation on Johannes Vermeer’s 17th-century Girl Reading a Letter at an Open Window, art detectives realized that a section of the canvas had been painted over after the Dutch artist’s death in 1675, concealing a cupid figure.

History, Life, Videos

“Quadrangle”, Award-Winning Doc About Marriage And Divorce

A documentary about two ‘conventional’ couples that swapped partners and lived in a group marriage in the early 70s, hoping to pioneer an alternative to divorce and pave the way for how people would live in the future.

Cities, History, Photos

Underground Photos From New York’s Seediest Years

The “Poet of Radical Photography”, Miron Zownir, captures the provocative energy and aggressive hedonism of New York City in the 80s.

Politics, Tech

Inside China’s Massive Surveillance Operation

Xinjiang, northwest China, is in a state of surveillance lockdown. Every message, word and movement is monitored for its extremist potential. A million Uyghur muslims are being held in concentration camps.

Cities, Long Reads, Politics

Vision And Reality In San Francisco’s Tech Corridor

When the ‘Twitter tax break’ took effect eight years ago, it was intended to draw tech companies to rundown Mid-Market Street and lead to a neighborhood revitalization. Did it succeed?

History, Life, Politics

Who Owns South Africa?

The Glen Grey Act was the first piece of legislation to enshrine in law the residential separation of the races. It was also the basis for the notorious Natives Land Act of 1913, which in its final form allocated a mere thirteen percent of all arable land to the black majority. 

Politics

The Quickest Way To Fix Presidential Elections

Abolishing the Electoral College and creating a national popular vote are far-fetched ideas for now. But there’s a more targeted way to reform American elections by 2020—starting with the swing states.

Health, Long Reads, Politics

The Mystery Of The Millionaire Hermit

He spent years scrimping and saving. But without a will, where’s his money going? When someone dies without a will, family trees dictate where the money goes. Each state has its own method to determine the line of succession.

We use cookies on this website to analyse your use of our products and services, provide content from third parties and assist with our marketing efforts. Learn more about our use of cookies and available controls: cookie policy. Please be aware that your experience may be disrupted until you accept cookies.