The People Who Shaped The World Wide Web • Discoverology

The People Who Shaped The World Wide Web

History, Long Reads, Tech

Thirty years ago, the world wide web was a way for scientists to share data. Since then, it’s become a critical force for industry, and how the world connects. But this didn’t happen all at once. The web’s evolution has been shaped by the geography of its creators and users.

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