The Pandemic Will Reduce Inequality—Or Make It Worse • Discoverology

The Pandemic Will Reduce Inequality—Or Make It Worse

Economics, Life

A recession is no picnic. A financial crisis leaves wounds that last for decades. A pandemic, though, can sow a unique kind of chaos. The rich got even richer after the Great Recession, but the Great Depression changed the social order.

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