The Most Common Type Of Incompetent Leader • Discoverology

The Most Common Type Of Incompetent Leader

Business

Research shows that absentee leadership is the most common form of incompetent leadership. Absentee leaders were promoted into management, and enjoy the privileges and rewards of a leadership role, but avoid meaningful involvement with their teams.

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