The Man Who Runs 365 Marathons A Year • Discoverology

The Man Who Runs 365 Marathons A Year

One day, Michael Shattuck started to run. He liked it, so he ran longer, sometimes for as many as 65 hours each week. He never wanted to stop. What was he running from?

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