The Madness Of Airline Élite Status • Discoverology

The Madness Of Airline Élite Status

Business, Economics, World

When you fly a lot for work, as I do, you check your frequent-flier mile balance often, to provide data for competitive commiseration. Frequent fliers sometimes go to great lengths to keep their airline élite status, and those efforts are often completely out of proportion to the perks.

Related tags
Related posts
Why Amazon Has So Many Counterfeit Goods

Why Amazon Has So Many Counterfeit Goods

Business, Tech, Videos

Seizures of counterfeit products at U.S. borders have increased 10-fold over the past two decades as e-commerce sales have boomed. The total value of seized goods – if they had been real – reached nearly $1.4 billion in 2018. Most are coming from mainland China or Hong Kong.

Photoprovocations By Russian Sergey Chilikov

Photoprovocations By Russian Sergey Chilikov

Art, Photos, World

Photography wasn’t given credence as a legitimate art form and even classic Soviet photography wasn’t included in museum exhibitions. In order to get their work seen, photographers started their own clubs, exchanging work with other clubs and organizing their own exhibitions and festivals.

The Economics Of Airline Class

The Economics Of Airline Class

Business, Economics, Videos

The story of the development of airline classes really isn’t the story of how airlines developed more and more luxurious seats, it’s how they cut costs to allow more and more people to fly. It’s also a fascinating demonstration of economics.

China’s Vanishing Mosques

China’s Vanishing Mosques

Videos, World

The BBC has found new evidence of the increasing control and suppression of Islam in China’s far western region of Xinjiang – including the widespread destruction of mosques. Authorities provided rare access to religious sites and senior Islamic officials to support their claim that their policies only target violent religious extremism, not faith itself.

Investigating The Dangerous New Mafia Taking Control In Italy

Investigating The Dangerous New Mafia Taking Control In Italy

Crime, Videos, World

The mafia is one of Italy’s most famous international business brands, with an estimated annual turnover of $250 billion a year. But its market share is being challenged by a group of ruthless new players. This documentary is about the growing power of Nigerian organized crime in the birthplace of the Italian mafia.

The True Story Of The White Island Eruption

The True Story Of The White Island Eruption

Long Reads, World

In December 2019, around 100 tourists set out for New Zealand’s Whakaari/White Island, where an active volcano has attracted hundreds of thousands of vacationers since the early 1990s. Then the volcano exploded. What happened next reveals troubling questions about the risks we’re willing to take when lives hang in the balance.

Life Under The Algorithm

Life Under The Algorithm

Business, Economics, Life, Long Reads

Increase your output, get paid more. Wages go up with productivity. Until, it turns out, they don’t anymore. The unwinding of this agreement in recent decades, such that workers must continue to produce more without expecting it to show up in their pay stubs, has now been the subject of a good deal of discussion and debate.

The Economics Of Cruise Ships

The Economics Of Cruise Ships

Business, Economics, Explainers

For decades, cruise companies have gone to great lengths to bypass US employment laws, hiring foreign workers for less than $2/hour. They’ve sheltered themselves as foreign entities while simultaneously benefitting from US taxpayer-funded agencies and resources.

The Ever-Growing Car: Why Do They Keep Getting Wider?

The Ever-Growing Car: Why Do They Keep Getting Wider?

Business, Design

We all know cars getting bigger and heavier. Most of us know why they are getting bigger, too. To comply with today’s stringent crash regulations – by passing offset, side and roof impact tests, as well as those evaluating pedestrian protection performance – cars require considerable cubic metres of controllably crushable bodywork.

The Saga Of Punkin’ Donuts

The Saga Of Punkin’ Donuts

Business, Long Reads

The Dunkin’ Donuts that used to be at the northwest corner of Belmont and Clark earned its nickname in the 80s and 90s. How a doughnut-shop parking lot became a confluence of Chicago youth subcultures—and what killed it off.

Can A Corporation “Own” A Color?

Can A Corporation “Own” A Color?

Art, Business, Design

A handful of companies like Coca-Cola, 3M and Cadbury, have pushed the boundaries of intellectual property law by laying claim to individual colors. But is it really possible to “own” a color?

The Decoy Effect: How You Are Influenced To Choose Without Really Knowing It

The Decoy Effect: How You Are Influenced To Choose Without Really Knowing It

Business, Economics

The decoy effect is defined as the phenomenon whereby consumers change their preference between two options when presented with a third option – the “decoy” – that is “asymmetrically dominated”. It is also referred to as the “attraction effect” or “asymmetric dominance effect”.

We use cookies on this website to analyse your use of our products and services, provide content from third parties and assist with our marketing efforts. Learn more about our use of cookies and available controls: cookie policy. Please be aware that your experience may be disrupted until you accept cookies.