The Lost Neighborhood Under New York's Central Park • Discoverology

The Lost Neighborhood Under New York’s Central Park

Cities, History, Videos

A story that goes back to the 1820s, when that part of New York was largely open countryside. Among them was a predominantly black community. It became known as Seneca Village. And when Irish and German immigrants moved in, it became a rare example at the time of an integrated neighborhood.

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