The Invisible City: How A Homeless Man Built A Life Underground • Discoverology

The Invisible City: How A Homeless Man Built A Life Underground

Long Reads

After decades among the hidden homeless, Dominic Van Allen dug himself a bunker beneath Hampstead Heath, a vast open space that sits as a sort of green beehive haircut on top of metropolitan central London. His life would get even more precarious.

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Long Reads, Nature, Science

Cape Canaveral contains one of the greatest concentrations of colonial shipwrecks in the world. The discovery of a legendary, lost shipwreck in North America has pitted treasure hunters and archaeologists against each other, raising questions about who should control sunken riches.

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Long Reads

The military’s toughest training challenges have a lot in common with outdoor sufferfests like the Barkley Marathons and the Leadville Trail 100: you have to be fit and motivated to make the starting line, but your mind and spirit are what carry you to the end.

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Long Reads, Nature

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History, Life, Long Reads, Politics

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History, Long Reads, Tech

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Long Reads

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Business, Economics, Life, Long Reads

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Long Reads, Nature

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History, Long Reads

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Cities, Long Reads

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Business, Long Reads

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