The Heart Of Today’s Billion-Dollar Sneaker-Collecting Boom Is 35 Years Old • Discoverology

The Heart Of Today’s Billion-Dollar Sneaker-Collecting Boom Is 35 Years Old

Nowadays, sneakers aren’t just for wearing. They’re an asset class, on display at museums, and fueling an increasingly profitable resale market. Much of that traces back to Nike putting a superstar rookie’s name on a new pair of kicks in 1985.

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