The End Of Babies • Discoverology

The End Of Babies

nytimes.com
18m read

Fertility rates have been dropping precipitously around the world for decades — in middle-income countries, in some low-income countries, but perhaps most markedly, in rich ones. Something is stopping us from creating the families we claim to desire. But what?

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