The Economy Of Cuba • Discoverology

The Economy Of Cuba

Economics, Videos

Cuba is home to possibly the most bizarre economy in the world. Its wild swings between a hardcore capitalist society to a worker’s paradise and now an odd combination of both has meant that the country has probably not been able to live up to its full potential.

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Spanish Flu: A Warning From History

Spanish Flu: A Warning From History

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Celebrations marking the end of the First World War were cut short by the onslaught of a devastating disease – the 1918-19 influenza pandemic. The University of Cambridge has made a new film exploring what we have learnt about Spanish Flu, the urgent threat posed by influenza today, and how scientists are preparing for future pandemics.

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Apps Have Changed The Way We Date

Apps, Tech, Videos

The online dating industry is projected to be worth $9 billion by 2025 and according to eHarmony, most people will find a partner via an app or website by 2035. Tinder is one of the most popular swiping apps with more than 5 million subscribers and it’s launched a whole new language of love.

The Invention Of Money

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How Rwanda Is Becoming The Singapore Of Africa

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Economics, Videos, World

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The Complexities Of A Universal Basic Income

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Economics, Politics

“Universal basic income” was for a long time an obscure term bandied about in economics circles. That’s no longer the case. The idea, usually involving a monthly cash grant to every person with no strings attached, has entered mainstream discourse. Small programs hint at how it might work — or not — on a national scale.

The Myth Of The Ethical Shopper

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Business, Economics, Long Reads

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Cities, Food, Health, Videos

In the ‘food deserts’ of Memphis, Tennessee, dominated by fast food outlets and convenience stores, locals lack what seems a basic human right in the richer half of the city: a supermarket. With a big gap in life expectancy, are these Americans doomed to die younger than their neighbours – or can they fight for their right to nutrition?

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Is The Hidden Kingdom Of Saudi Arabia Ready To Open To The World?

Videos, World

The ‘hidden kingdom’ of Saudi Arabia has been mostly closed to journalists and travelers…until now. In a glitzy PR push, the country wants to promote itself as a tourist destination. Foreign Correspondent rides the magic carpet to extraordinary sites, thousands of years old, holding mysteries archaeologists are just beginning to uncover.

Why China’s First Military Base Abroad Is In Africa

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Politics, Videos

For many countries, the Republic of Djibouti has become the central anchor point in the region. It hosts military bases from France, the United States, Japan, Italy and, since 2017, China. The fact that so many countries want to be present here has to do with the location, which is important for a lot of reasons.

Why Babies Can’t Drink Water

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Food, Health, Videos

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The Economics Of Cruise Ships

Business, Economics, Explainers

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Dubai – perhaps the best-known city of the United Arab Emirates, with a reputation for attracting the glamorous and the wealthy. Less than 5% of its GDP comes from oil, but it essentially has made its success through diversifying into property real estate, aviation, trade, banking and finance. But what’s going on beneath the surface?

The Economy Of Italy, Has The Luck All Run Out?

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Economics, Explainers, Videos

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How Airlines Make Meals For Thousands Of People

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Explainers, Food, Videos

For many people economy class used to mean soggy pasta, rubbery eggs and dried-out chicken. For a time U.S airlines even stopped serving free meals altogether in economy class. But in 2019 U.S. airlines posted their tenth straight year of profitability and premium and economy cabins are seeing more food options than ever before.

Portrait Of A Place: Steel Town

Portrait Of A Place: Steel Town

Videos

Capable of producing nearly five million tonnes of steel each year, the steelworks in Port Talbot, South Wales is the UK’s largest—and it’s currently losing £1 million each day. Here, London-based director Robin Mason talks about his portrait of the town at a vital moment in its history.

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