The Economics Of Airline Class • Discoverology

The Economics Of Airline Class

The story of the development of airline classes really isn’t the story of how airlines developed more and more luxurious seats, it’s how they cut costs to allow more and more people to fly. It’s also a fascinating demonstration of economics.

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