The Dictatorship Of Data • Discoverology

The Dictatorship Of Data

Economics, History

Big data is poised to transform society. Yet big data also exacerbates a very old problem: relying on the numbers when they are far more fallible than we think. Nothing underscores the consequences of data analysis gone awry more than the story of Robert McNamara.

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