The Data That Turned The World Upside Down • Discoverology

The Data That Turned The World Upside Down

Long Reads, Media, Politics, Tech

How Cambridge Analytica used your Facebook data to help the Donald Trump campaign in the 2016 election. A then little-known British company sent out a press release: “We are thrilled that our revolutionary approach to data-driven communication has played such an integral part in President-elect Trump’s extraordinary win.”

Related tags
Related posts
It’s Not You. Phones Are Designed To Be Addicting.

It’s Not You. Phones Are Designed To Be Addicting.

Apps, Explainers, Tech, Videos

Today’s phones are hard to put down. Push notifications buzz in your pocket, red bubbles demand attention, and endless distractions sit at your fingertips. It can feel impossible to pull away from. The 3 design elements that make smartphones so hard to put down, explained by Google’s former design ethicist.

What Happened When Tulsa Paid People To Work Remotely

What Happened When Tulsa Paid People To Work Remotely

Business, Long Reads

Traditionally, cities looking to spur their economies may offer incentives to attract businesses. Tulsa is testing out a new premise: Pay people instead. The first class of hand-picked remote workers moved to Tulsa in exchange for $10,000 and a built-in community. The city might just be luring them to stay.

Inside X, Google’s Top-Secret Moonshot Factory

Inside X, Google’s Top-Secret Moonshot Factory

Innovation, Long Reads, Science, Tech

Within Alphabet, Google’s parent company, it is grouped alongside Deepmind in “Other Bets”, although in that metaphor, X is more like the gambler. Its stated aim is to pursue what it calls “moonshots” – to try to solve humanity’s great problems by inventing radical new technologies.

The Million-Dollar Hacker

The Million-Dollar Hacker

Tech, Videos

Tommy DeVoss used to break into websites illicitly. But after serving time for his crimes, he now uses his skills to earn an honest living. Through arrangements known as bug bounty programs, companies pay him to find security holes in their systems. He’s now earned more than $1 million in this emerging profession.

Faith, Friendship, And Tragedy At Santa Fe High

Faith, Friendship, And Tragedy At Santa Fe High

Long Reads

Sabika Sheikh, a Muslim exchange student from Pakistan with dreams of changing the world, struck up an unlikely friendship with an evangelical Christian girl. The two became inseparable—until the day a fellow student opened fire.

The People Who Shaped The World Wide Web

The People Who Shaped The World Wide Web

History, Long Reads, Tech

Thirty years ago, the world wide web was a way for scientists to share data. Since then, it’s become a critical force for industry, and how the world connects. But this didn’t happen all at once. The web’s evolution has been shaped by the geography of its creators and users.

The Climate Crisis Isn’t Coming, It’s Already Here

The Climate Crisis Isn’t Coming, It’s Already Here

Long Reads, Nature

The climate crises will spell our doom, a disaster that’s not merely on its way—it’s already here. Rosecrans Baldwin embeds with the government agents and the doomsday experts preparing now for the plagues, and the panics, and the fast-approaching day when life on our warming planet finally falls apart.

Defeated Chess Champ Garry Kasparov Has Made Peace With AI

Defeated Chess Champ Garry Kasparov Has Made Peace With AI

Science, Tech

For almost two decades after becoming world champion in 1985, Garry Kasparov dominated the game with a ferocious style of play and an equally ferocious swagger. In 1997, at the height of his powers, Kasparov was crushed and cowed by an IBM supercomputer called Deep Blue.

Mapping America’s Stark Wage Inequality

Mapping America’s Stark Wage Inequality

Cities, Economics, Politics

One of the most important economic stories of the past couple of decades is the rise of economic inequality in the United States and around the world. Since 1980, economists say, wage growth for the highest-paid workers has been roughly triple that for the lowest paid. In some cities, the disparity is wider.

The Remote ‘Democratic’ Oasis Of Soviet Russia

The Remote ‘Democratic’ Oasis Of Soviet Russia

History, Politics, Videos, World

The academic town of Akademgorodok in Siberia was created by Russian mathematician Mikhaïl Alekseïevitch Lavrentiev, who wanted to install a safe haven for scientists in the middle of Siberia. Such isolation from Moscow created a fertile scientific and cultural nest away from the influence of the State and its politics.

The World’s Oldest Winery in Armenia

The World’s Oldest Winery in Armenia

Food, History, Long Reads, World

The Areni-1 complex, uncovered in 2007, contains a 6,100-year-old winery replete with fermenting vats, a grape press, and subterranean clay storage vessels. Altogether, it’s the best-preserved archeological site in the ongoing search for winemaking’s birthplace.

Plane Stowaway: The Man Who Fell From The Sky

Plane Stowaway: The Man Who Fell From The Sky

Crime, Long Reads, World

It was sunny and warm on 30 June as residents in south London finished their lunch and unwound on a leisurely Sunday afternoon. But the peace was shattered in Offerton Road with a terrifying thump. A man occupied a crater in one of the back gardens after falling through the sky for a kilometer.

We use cookies on this website to analyse your use of our products and services, provide content from third parties and assist with our marketing efforts. Learn more about our use of cookies and available controls: cookie policy. Please be aware that your experience may be disrupted until you accept cookies.