The Curse Of The Ship Of Gold • Discoverology

The Curse Of The Ship Of Gold

History, Long Reads

How Tommy Thompson, a brilliant scientist, went from discovering a mother lode of treasure at the bottom of the sea to fleeing from authorities with suitcases full of cash.

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The Day The Music Died: Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens And The Big Bopper

The Day The Music Died: Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens And The Big Bopper

History, Videos

When Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and J.P. “The Big Bopper” Richardson passed away on February 3rd, 1959 after a small plane crash, rock and roll lost some of its most notable early pioneers. Singer-songwriter Don McLean called this moment in music history “The Day the Music Died,” in his song “American Pie.”

On Harriet Tubman’s Final Escape Mission

On Harriet Tubman’s Final Escape Mission

History

There was one more dire mission to complete; she had to return to Maryland and try once again to rescue her sister Rachel and her two children, Angerine and Ben. With the exception of these three people, Harriet had pulled her entire immediate family that remained in Maryland away from slavery’s hold.

Under The Weather

Under The Weather

Health, Long Reads, Nature

As psychiatrists and philosophers begin to define a pervasive mental health crisis triggered by climate change, they ask who is really sick: the individual or society?

Missouri Charmer Led Double Life, Masterminded One Of The Biggest Frauds In Farm History

Missouri Charmer Led Double Life, Masterminded One Of The Biggest Frauds In Farm History

Crime, Long Reads

Like all the best con artists, Randy Constant was a charmer, hard not to like. You’d never have guessed that the father of three, grandfather of five was a liar, cheat and serial philanderer who masterminded one of the biggest and longest-running frauds in the history of American agriculture.

Behind The Scenes Of A Radical New Cancer Cure

Behind The Scenes Of A Radical New Cancer Cure

Health, Long Reads, Science

CAR-T involves removing a patient’s own blood, filtering for immune cells called T-cells, and genetically engineering those cells to recognize and attack cancer. CAR-T made history in 2017 as the first FDA-approved gene therapy to treat any disease. The trials that led to approval showed response rates of 80 percent and above in aggressive leukemias and lymphomas that had resisted chemotherapy.

Post-War East Harlem Photographed By Leo Goldstein

Post-War East Harlem Photographed By Leo Goldstein

History, Photos

Leo Goldstein began capturing East Harlem in 1949 after he’d joined the New York Photo League, a photo club that originated around the beginning of the Great Depression. Having remained largely unseen for the last 70 years, his photographs are now the focus of a new book, East Harlem: The Postwar Years.

The Music In You

The Music In You

Life, Long Reads, Psychology

The more psychologists investigate musicality, the more it seems that nearly all of us are musical experts, in quite a startling sense. You might not be a virtuoso, but you have remarkable music abilities. You just don’t know about them yet.

Inside Mark Zuckerberg’s Lost Notebook

Inside Mark Zuckerberg’s Lost Notebook

Long Reads, Tech

In a journal with unlined 8-by-10 paper, Zuckerberg sketched his mission and product design and explored how a tiny company might become a vital utility for the world. In detail, he described features called Open Registration and Feed, two products that would supercharge his company.

Why We Fell For Clean Eating

Why We Fell For Clean Eating

Apps, Food, Long Reads

The oh-so-Instagrammable food movement has been thoroughly debunked – but it shows no signs of going away. The real question is why we were so desperate to believe it.

Plane Stowaway: The Man Who Fell From The Sky

Plane Stowaway: The Man Who Fell From The Sky

Crime, Long Reads, World

It was sunny and warm on 30 June as residents in south London finished their lunch and unwound on a leisurely Sunday afternoon. But the peace was shattered in Offerton Road with a terrifying thump. A man occupied a crater in one of the back gardens after falling through the sky for a kilometer.

Treasure Fever

Treasure Fever

Long Reads, Nature, Science

Cape Canaveral contains one of the greatest concentrations of colonial shipwrecks in the world. The discovery of a legendary, lost shipwreck in North America has pitted treasure hunters and archaeologists against each other, raising questions about who should control sunken riches.

What Do We Do With Robert E. Lee?

What Do We Do With Robert E. Lee?

History, Long Reads, Politics

The president of Washington and Lee University, Will Dudley, understood the depth of his problem the moment he turned on the television and saw hoards of white men in collared shirts and khakis carrying tiki torches as they marched through Charlottesville, Virginia, protesting the removal of a statue of Robert E. Lee.

How Adorable R360 Coupe Shaped Mazda’s Design DNA

How Adorable R360 Coupe Shaped Mazda’s Design DNA

Design, History

The Japanese brand might be celebrating their 100 year anniversary in 2020 but it was 60 years ago that one model, in particular, set the benchmark for Mazda and microcars at large. priced at just 300,000 ¥ (around $830 USD), the small, adorable Mazda R360 coupe was more than a city car.

The Man Who Walked Backward

The Man Who Walked Backward

History, Long Reads, World

When the Great Depression put Plennie Wingo’s bustling Abilene, Texas, cafe out of business, he tried to find fame, fortune, and a sense of meaning the only way he knew how: by embarking on an audacious trip around the world on foot. In reverse.

How Facebook Works For Trump

How Facebook Works For Trump

Long Reads, Media, Politics

During the 2016 election cycle, Trump’s team ran 5.9 million ads on Facebook, spending $44 million from June to November alone. He won the presidency by using the social network’s advertising machinery in exactly the way the company wanted. He’s poised to do it again.

The Day Australia Burned

The Day Australia Burned

Long Reads, Nature

Months of drought and high temperatures pushed the country to one of its worst-ever wildfire seasons. On New Year’s Eve the terrified citizens of New South Wales saw a glimpse of Australia’s new future.

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