The Curse Of The Ship Of Gold • Discoverology

The Curse Of The Ship Of Gold

How Tommy Thompson, a brilliant scientist, went from discovering a mother lode of treasure at the bottom of the sea to fleeing from authorities with suitcases full of cash.

Related topics
Related posts
CBS News Coverage Of The Apollo 11 Moon Launch

CBS News Coverage Of The Apollo 11 Moon Launch

History Media Videos

The Saturn V rocket carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong, Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin and Michael Collins launched from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 9:32 a.m. on July 16, 1969 — and just four days later, man first set foot on the moon. The moon mission was a milestone in human history. But it was also a groundbreaking moment in broadcast television.

The Race To Develop The Moon

The Race To Develop The Moon

Long Reads Science

For science, profit, and pride, China, the U.S., and private companies are hunting for resources on the lunar surface. It’s not difficult to imagine moon development, like all development, proceeding less than peacefully, and less than equitably.

Iron Is The New Cholesterol

Iron Is The New Cholesterol

Health Life Long Reads

Oxygen and iron are essential for the production of energy, but may also conspire to destroy the delicate order of our cells. Elevated iron is at the center of a web of disease stretching from cancer to diabetes.

The Long-Forgotten Vigilante Murders Of The San Luis Valley

The Long-Forgotten Vigilante Murders Of The San Luis Valley

Crime History Long Reads

For more than a century, historians, writers, and artists were guilty of creating a mythologized version of the American West. How history forgot Felipe and Vivián Espinosa, two of the American West’s most brutal killers—and the complicated story behind their murderous rampage.

How Space Tries To Kill You And Make You Ugly

How Space Tries To Kill You And Make You Ugly

Long Reads Science

Outer space is the most noxious of substances: devoid of air and filled with a soup of deadly particles in the form of high-energy photons and energetic bits of atomic nuclei. The lack of gravity there affects every element of your being, as even the proteins in your body can’t figure out which way is up.

Lives Adrift In A Warming World

Lives Adrift In A Warming World

Long Reads Nature Photos World

If the Earth’s average temperature increases 2 degrees Celsius by the year 2100, humankind will see catastrophic changes. For millions of people, this extreme warming is already reality, in places like Qatar, Colorado and Angola. And Aaliyah, at the age of 9, has become a climate refugee in Newtok, Alaska.

How A Volcanic Eruption Helped Create Modern Scotland

How A Volcanic Eruption Helped Create Modern Scotland

History Nature Science

Over seven terrible years in the 1690s, crops failed, farming villages emptied, and severe famine killed up to 15% of the entire population of Scotland. Soon after, the formerly independent nation joined Great Britain. Now, researchers suggest volcanic eruptions thousands of kilometers away may have helped spark this political transformation.

The Doomsday Invention: Will Artificial Intelligence Bring Us Utopia Or Destruction?

The Doomsday Invention: Will Artificial Intelligence Bring Us Utopia Or Destruction?

Innovation Long Reads Science Tech

Philosopher Nick Bostrom argues that true artificial intelligence, if it is realized, might pose a danger that exceeds every previous threat from technology—even nuclear weapons—and that if its development is not managed carefully humanity risks engineering its own extinction.

The Many Lives Of Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah”

The Many Lives Of Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah”

History Media

Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah” has been covered by more than 300 other artists in virtually every genre. It’s an impressive feat by any standard, but even more so when you consider that “Hallelujah” was originally stuck on side two of an album that Cohen’s record label deemed unfit for release.

Going The Distance (And Beyond) To Catch Marathon Cheaters

Going The Distance (And Beyond) To Catch Marathon Cheaters

Long Reads

Derek Murphy investigates runners whose times seem suspicious, which is what brought him to a 70-year-old doctor named Frank Meza. He’d run an exceptional time of 2 hours, 53 minutes that day, setting a record for the fastest marathon ever run by a man his age.

A Vision For Agriculture

A Vision For Agriculture

Food Innovation Long Reads

Allowing cows out to harvest their own feed and spread their own manure is the most profitable means of producing meat and milk. But, somehow, agricultural science has encouraged farmers to mount a treadmill of increasing yields of milk or meat by increasing the amount of production per unit input.

The Strange & Curious Tale Of The Last True Hermit

The Strange & Curious Tale Of The Last True Hermit

Crime Long Reads

For nearly thirty years, a phantom haunted the woods of Central Maine. Unseen and unknown, he lived in secret, creeping into homes in the dead of night and surviving on what he could steal. To the spooked locals, he became a legend—or maybe a myth. They wondered how he could possibly be real.

What Happened When Tulsa Paid People To Work Remotely

What Happened When Tulsa Paid People To Work Remotely

Business Long Reads

Traditionally, cities looking to spur their economies may offer incentives to attract businesses. Tulsa is testing out a new premise: Pay people instead. The first class of hand-picked remote workers moved to Tulsa in exchange for $10,000 and a built-in community. The city might just be luring them to stay.

The Doomsday Glacier

The Doomsday Glacier

Long Reads Nature

Thwaites Glacier in West Antarctica is so remote that only 28 human beings have ever set foot on it. In the farthest reaches of Antarctica, a nightmare scenario of crumbling ice – and rapidly rising seas – could spell disaster for a warming planet.

How Eliud Kipchoge Broke Running’s Mythic Barrier

How Eliud Kipchoge Broke Running’s Mythic Barrier

Long Reads

It was one of sport’s great question marks: Is it humanly possible to run 26.2 miles in under two hours? Then Eliud Kipchoge did it. What followed was international fame—and plenty of controversy. GQ flew to Kipchoge’s ultra-rarefied Kenyan training ground to meet the man who pulled off the impossible.

How Millennials Became The Burnout Generation

How Millennials Became The Burnout Generation

Health Life Long Reads Psychology

We’re spoiled, entitled, lazy, and failures at what’s come to be known as “adulting,” a word invented by millennials as a catchall for the tasks of self-sufficient existence. I couldn’t figure out why small, straightforward tasks on my to-do list felt so impossible. The answer is both more complex and far simpler than I expected.

We use cookies on this website to analyse your use of our products and services, provide content from third parties and assist with our marketing efforts. Learn more about our use of cookies and available controls: cookie policy. Please be aware that your experience may be disrupted until you accept cookies.