The Curious Cultural Rise Of The Town That Gave Us Walmart • Discoverology

The Curious Cultural Rise Of The Town That Gave Us Walmart

In 2011, Bentonville unveiled the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art. It was the biggest art museum opening in America in almost 40 years, and it launched Bentonville — a rural community known only for Walmart — into the cultural spotlight overnight.

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