The Curious Cultural Rise Of The Town That Gave Us Walmart • Discoverology

The Curious Cultural Rise Of The Town That Gave Us Walmart

Business, Cities

In 2011, Bentonville unveiled the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art. It was the biggest art museum opening in America in almost 40 years, and it launched Bentonville — a rural community known only for Walmart — into the cultural spotlight overnight.

Related tags
Related posts
Living In Switzerland Ruined Me For America And Its Lousy Work Culture

Living In Switzerland Ruined Me For America And Its Lousy Work Culture

Business, Life

Long commute, full-time, no benefits. No way, I thought. Who would want to do that? And then it hit me: Either I had become a completely privileged jerk or my own country was not as amazing as I had once thought it to be. This wasn’t an unusually bad offer: It was just American Reality.

Big Tech Takes Aim At The Low-Profit Retail-Banking Industry

Big Tech Takes Aim At The Low-Profit Retail-Banking Industry

Business, Economics, Innovation, Tech

After years of timidity Big Tech, with its billions of users and gigantic war chest, at last appears serious about crashing the fintech party. Amazon and Apple introduced a credit card. Facebook announced a new payments system and Google said it would start offering current (checking) accounts in America.

Is This A Chinese City In Malaysia?

Is This A Chinese City In Malaysia?

Architecture, Cities, Videos, World

Forest City is being built in the Malaysian state of Johor in the southern part of the country. Here, the Johore Strait acts as a natural border between Malaysia and the independent city-state Singapore. It is one of the most ambitious urban development projects currently underway. An entire new city built from scratch.

Your Plastic Addiction Is Bankrolling Big Oil

Your Plastic Addiction Is Bankrolling Big Oil

Business, Nature

As the world transitions slowly but surely away from fuel-guzzling cars, gas-powered buildings, and coal-fired power plants, fossil fuel company execs must count on growth that comes from somewhere else—and they see their savior as plastics.

The Dark Side Of Electronic Waste Recycling

The Dark Side Of Electronic Waste Recycling

Business, Nature, Science, Tech

Electronics can be hazardous when disposed of improperly, and the Basel Action Network, or BAN, investigates the underground world of the e-waste trade. The nonprofit group secretly embeds trackers in discarded devices, then hands them to recyclers to see where they end up, exposing bad practices in the process.

The Economics Of Airline Class

The Economics Of Airline Class

Business, Economics, Videos

The story of the development of airline classes really isn’t the story of how airlines developed more and more luxurious seats, it’s how they cut costs to allow more and more people to fly. It’s also a fascinating demonstration of economics.

The Decoy Effect: How You Are Influenced To Choose Without Really Knowing It

The Decoy Effect: How You Are Influenced To Choose Without Really Knowing It

Business, Economics

The decoy effect is defined as the phenomenon whereby consumers change their preference between two options when presented with a third option – the “decoy” – that is “asymmetrically dominated”. It is also referred to as the “attraction effect” or “asymmetric dominance effect”.

The Lie That Helped Build Nintendo

The Lie That Helped Build Nintendo

Business, History, Tech, Videos

In 1981, a young Swede called Owe Bergsten strolled through Singapore to pass the time before his flight home. Passing a camera shop, he spotted a two-button LCD game called ‘Fire RC-04’ in the window. The story of a man, a lie, a video game handheld, and a business empire.

Africa’s Richest Man Makes A $17 Billion Bid For Immortality

Africa’s Richest Man Makes A $17 Billion Bid For Immortality

Business, World

Aliko Dangote’s plan to reduce Nigeria’s dependency on fuel imports will carve out an even bigger slice of the nation’s $376 billion economy for his empire. Dangote’s future—and, as he likes to say, that of the entire continent’s economy—lies to the south on the Nigerian coast: the construction of a vast oil refinery.

Why Do Countries Build New Capital Cities?

Why Do Countries Build New Capital Cities?

Cities, Videos

It doesn’t seem obvious why a government will want to move its capital from a major city to a place where almost nobody lives but a couple of dozen countries have done it since 1950. In every case, the government of these countries gave a certain rationale for their decision.

The Day The Pirates Came

The Day The Pirates Came

Business, Long Reads

For Sudeep Choudhury, work on merchant ships promised adventure and a better life. But a voyage on an oil tanker in West Africa, in dangerous seas far from home, would turn the young graduate’s life upside down. His fate would come to depend on a band of drug-fuelled jungle pirates – and the whims of a mysterious figure called The King.

How A Single Mom Created A Plastic Food-Storage Empire

How A Single Mom Created A Plastic Food-Storage Empire

Business, History, Long Reads

The story of Tupperware is a story of innovation and reinvention: how a new kind of plastic, made from industrial waste material, ended up a symbol of female empowerment. The product ushered women into the workforce, encouraging them to make their own money, better their families, and win accolades and prizes.

How The Mast Brothers Fooled The World Into Paying $10 A Bar For Crappy Hipster Chocolate

How The Mast Brothers Fooled The World Into Paying $10 A Bar For Crappy Hipster Chocolate

Business, Food

While customers can’t get enough of the company’s bearded, Brooklyn hipster founders, and their brilliantly marketed, $10 “bean to bar” chocolates, a term reserved for chocolate that has been produced entirely under the maker’s control, from the cocoa bean to the wrapped bar, chocolate experts have shunned them.

Smart Frames For Growing Plants In The City

Smart Frames For Growing Plants In The City

Cities, Design, Innovation

French company, Urban Canopee, has developed lightweight, adaptable and flexible frames, which serve as support for climbing plants — both in isolation or in groups — and to create a verdant canopy. The company hopes the easy-to-use frames will be used to grow plants on the roofs of buildings and other public spaces.

We use cookies on this website to analyse your use of our products and services, provide content from third parties and assist with our marketing efforts. Learn more about our use of cookies and available controls: cookie policy. Please be aware that your experience may be disrupted until you accept cookies.