The Criminalization Of The American Midwife • Discoverology

The Criminalization Of The American Midwife

Health, Long Reads

New York midwife Elizabeth Catlin faces 95 individual felony counts at her upcoming trial. For what? For doing her job. Politics and patriarchy make the work of many credentialed, experienced midwives illegal — to the detriment of women and underserved communities.

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How A Good Scam Can Bypass Our Defences

How A Good Scam Can Bypass Our Defences

Crime, Long Reads

Scammers exploit cognitive errors, like “optimism bias.” Most people think they’re a little bit charmed, a little luckier than average. We harbour a personal fable that things are likely to go well for us.

The Forgotten Tiger King Of Harlem

The Forgotten Tiger King Of Harlem

Long Reads

Antoine Yates spent three years living peacefully inside his New York City apartment with his ‘roommate’ — a 450-pound Siberian tiger named Ming. Until, that is, Ming’s animal instincts kicked in and he mauled Yates in the middle of their kitchen.

Is Marriage Over?

Is Marriage Over?

Life, Long Reads

Marriage is practiced in every society yet is in steep decline globally. Is marriage collapsing because empowered women have less need for pair-bonds? Many writers trace the decline of marriage to the growing ease of single parenthood.

Please Do Not Try To Survive On An All-Meat Diet

Please Do Not Try To Survive On An All-Meat Diet

Food, Health

If your love of ribeye knows no bounds, perhaps you’d be interested in the carnivore diet. However, you need 13 vitamins in order to live, and though you can actually get most of them from eating a variety of meats, you’re going to miss out on some crucial ones if you totally forego flora.

The Behavioral Economics Diet: The Science of Killing a Bad Habit

The Behavioral Economics Diet: The Science of Killing a Bad Habit

Food, Health

Diets don’t work. Studies show that temporary fixes to old habits actually make people gain weight. Essentially, the dieter’s brain is trained to gorge when off the diet and inevitably the weight returns. Putting some skin in the game makes people more likely to accomplish their goal of stopping a bad habit.

What Happened When Tulsa Paid People To Work Remotely

What Happened When Tulsa Paid People To Work Remotely

Business, Long Reads

Traditionally, cities looking to spur their economies may offer incentives to attract businesses. Tulsa is testing out a new premise: Pay people instead. The first class of hand-picked remote workers moved to Tulsa in exchange for $10,000 and a built-in community. The city might just be luring them to stay.

How An Olympic Hopeful Robbed 26 Banks On His Bike

How An Olympic Hopeful Robbed 26 Banks On His Bike

Crime, Long Reads

Tom Justice put the $20 and $100 bills into paper bags and discarded them in alleys where he knew homeless people would find them. He took all the $2 bills and hid them in the bushes outside his apartment, then watched as kids discovered the money and screamed and giggled.

‘Angels’ In Hell: The Culture Of Misogyny Inside Victoria’s Secret

‘Angels’ In Hell: The Culture Of Misogyny Inside Victoria’s Secret

Business, Long Reads

Victoria’s Secret defined femininity for millions of women. But inside the company, two powerful men presided over an entrenched culture of misogyny, bullying and harassment, according to interviews with more than 30 current and former executives, employees, contractors and models, as well as court filings and other documents.

What Do We Do With Robert E. Lee?

What Do We Do With Robert E. Lee?

History, Long Reads, Politics

The president of Washington and Lee University, Will Dudley, understood the depth of his problem the moment he turned on the television and saw hoards of white men in collared shirts and khakis carrying tiki torches as they marched through Charlottesville, Virginia, protesting the removal of a statue of Robert E. Lee.

Uber Wars In Argentina

Uber Wars In Argentina

Apps, Long Reads, Tech

Since Uber arrived in Argentina in 2016, taxi drivers have come out in force, torching ride-share cars, beating drivers, and shaming passengers. There have been more than 1,041 fights — that have been reported to police, anyway.

The Art World’s Mini-Madoff And Me

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Art, Crime, Long Reads

Inigo Philbrick made his money betting big on a rise in price for a few artists, notably Stingel, who is known for his seemingly endless series of indistinguishable paintings of wallpaper, and Wool, whose most famous text painting fittingly spells out the word FOOL.

The Metaphysics Of The Hangover

The Metaphysics Of The Hangover

Health, Science

A hangover is about being poisoned, no doubt. The toxins linger in the body and must be expelled, or waited out. We’re sick with a mini-flu and need to get better. But isn’t a hangover about more than physical toxins, at least some of the time? I’ll wager that a hangover is frequently about shame as well.

Inside The Booming Business Of Background Music

Inside The Booming Business Of Background Music

Long Reads, Media

The background music industry – also known as music design, music consultancy or something offered as part of a broader package of “experiential design” or “sensory marketing” – is constantly deciding what we hear as we go about our everyday business. The biggest player in the industry, Mood Media, supplies music to 560,000 locations across the world, from Sainsbury’s to KFC.

Dressing For The Surveillance Age

Dressing For The Surveillance Age

Cities, Long Reads, Tech

As cities become ever more packed with cameras that always see, public anonymity could disappear. Can stealth streetwear evade electronic eyes? Is there anything fashion can do to counter the erosion of public anonymity?

Welcome To The Monkey House

Welcome To The Monkey House

Crime, History, Long Reads, Politics

Between the end of the Korean War and the early 1990s, more than one million Korean women were caught up in a state-controlled prostitution industry that was blessed at the highest levels by the U.S. military. They worked in special zones surrounding U.S. bases—areas licensed by the South Korean government.

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