The Bomb Didn’t Beat Japan… Stalin Did • Discoverology

The Bomb Didn’t Beat Japan… Stalin Did

History, Long Reads

The US bombed Hiroshima and Nagasaki, when the Japanese finally succumbed to the threat of further nuclear bombardment and surrendered. The support for this narrative runs deep. But there are three major problems with it, and, taken together, they significantly undermine the traditional interpretation of the Japanese surrender.

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