The Art World’s Mini-Madoff And Me • Discoverology

The Art World’s Mini-Madoff And Me

Art, Crime, Long Reads

Inigo Philbrick made his money betting big on a rise in price for a few artists, notably Stingel, who is known for his seemingly endless series of indistinguishable paintings of wallpaper, and Wool, whose most famous text painting fittingly spells out the word FOOL.

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