The '3.5% Rule': How A Small Minority Can Change The World • Discoverology

The ‘3.5% Rule’: How A Small Minority Can Change The World

bbc.com
9m read

Nonviolent protests are twice as likely to succeed as armed conflicts – and those engaging a threshold of 3.5% of the population have never failed to bring about change.

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