The 10/10/10 Rule For Tough Decisions • Discoverology

The 10/10/10 Rule For Tough Decisions

It’s good to sleep on it when there are tough choices to make, but you also need a strategy once you wake up–which is why you should employ the 10/10/10 rule. How will we feel about it 10 minutes from now? How about 10 months from now? How about 10 years from now?

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