Best Articles & Videos about Africa on the web

Africa

Read the best africa articles from around the internet, or watch the most insightful videos about africa from platforms like Youtube, Vimeo or leading publishers like The New York Times, The Atlantic, LA Times, Bloomberg, New Yorker, Wall Street Journal and many more.
Red Sea Diving Resort: The Holiday Village Run By Spies

Red Sea Diving Resort: The Holiday Village Run By Spies

Crime, World

Arous was an idyllic holiday resort in the Sudanese desert, on the shores of the Red Sea. But this glamorous destination was also a base for Israeli agents with a secret mission. The events inspired a newly released Netflix film, Red Sea Diving Resort – and the real story is in many ways more remarkable.

Buried In Sand For A Millennium: Africa’s Roman Ghost City

Buried In Sand For A Millennium: Africa’s Roman Ghost City

History, World

Timgad is a lost Roman city on the edge of the Sahara desert in Algeria that remained hidden beneath the sand for nearly a thousand years. Positively obscure compared to the international notoriety of Pompeii, this ancient city is nonetheless one of the best surviving examples of Roman town planning anywhere in the historical Empire.

The Most Extreme Railway In The World

The Most Extreme Railway In The World

Videos, World

At 430 miles long, the formidable Mauritania Railway, nicknamed the “backbone of the Sahara,” boasts some of the longest and heaviest trains in the world. Its journey begins in Zouerat, Mauritania, and runs across the searing desert to the port city of Nouadhibou, on Africa’s Atlantic coast.

Young Girls Force-Fed For Marriage In Mauritania

Young Girls Force-Fed For Marriage In Mauritania

Videos, World

Some Mauritanian communities believe that the fatter girls look the wealthier and more attractive they appear to men. Sahar Zand meets the families force feeding their young girls a 9,000 calorie-a-day diet during a brutal “feeding season” in Mauritania.

The Myth Of The Ethical Shopper

The Myth Of The Ethical Shopper

Business, Economics, Long Reads

What has happened in those sweatshops since they became a cultural fixation three decades ago? All sources led to the same conclusion: Boycotts have failed. Our clothes are being made in ways that advocacy campaigns can’t affect and in places they can’t reach. So how are we going to stop sweatshops now?

Young Refugees Document The Squalor, And Hope, Around Them

Young Refugees Document The Squalor, And Hope, Around Them

Photos, World

More than 4,100 refugees live in Samos Reception and Identification Center in Greece, a compound built for 650, awaiting their fate. Some have been here for years, and they include people from dozens of nations across the Middle East, Central Asia and Africa. They also include some 1,200 children, many of them unaccompanied minors.

The Junk Art King Of Zambia

The Junk Art King Of Zambia

Art, World

Frederick Phiri is the junk-art king of central Africa: At just 22, he’s started to earn an international reputation for being able to make intricate and elegant sculptures from scrap metal found in his community.

The Last Days Of John Allen Chau

The Last Days Of John Allen Chau

Crime, Long Reads, Nature, World

In the fall of 2018, the 26-year-old American missionary traveled to a remote speck of sand and jungle in the Indian Ocean, attempting to convert one of the planet’s last uncontacted tribes to Christianity. The islanders killed him, and Chau was pilloried around the world as a deluded Christian supremacist who deserved to die.

Davide Bonazzi

Inspiration
Davide Bonazzi
Eating The Arab Roots Of Sicilian Cuisine

Eating The Arab Roots Of Sicilian Cuisine

Food

Seen from the sky, the island appears as a triangularish football being punted toward the Maghreb by Italy’s boot. It’s a pixelated reflection of Sicilian identity itself, which hovers midway between North African and European. For Sicilians, mal d’Africa is a kind of phantom continent syndrome, a sense of nostalgia for a lost homeland.

Who Owns South Africa?

Who Owns South Africa?

History, Life, Long Reads, Politics

The Glen Grey Act was the first piece of legislation to enshrine in law the residential separation of the races. It was also the basis for the notorious Natives Land Act of 1913, which in its final form allocated a mere thirteen percent of all arable land to the black majority. 

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